Colin and Justin’s Cabin Pressure Season Two

by Colin & Justin

Is it really a whole year since ‘Colin and Justin’s Cabin Pressure’, Season One, aired on the Cottage Life television network? Yup, 12 months have passed and, in that time, we’ve turned our attentions from Muskoka (location, for Season One) to Haliburton where we recently bought another slanty shanty – one that was almost falling down thanks to collapsed piers, major rot and serious animal infestation. But little fazes us: we, after all, can fix anything. Even if it means shedding desperate tears and dealing with construction issues that we’d rather leave to Bryan. Geddit? “Leave It To Bryan”? Oh never mind…

Colin and Justin - Cottage

Photography by Brandon Barre

But worry not: we turned adversity into joy. Our 800 feet collapsing marvel is positioned on beautiful Drag Lake, and, courtesy of its south west elevation – and good bones – it had potential written all over it. Let’s just say, though, that our reparative budget doubled… but so too did our final vision. In just four short months, we went from ‘pig in lipstick’ to beauty queen and we couldn’t be happier with the transformation. In exterior terms, it’s a veritable vision of Scandinavian minimalism: all graphite grey siding and jet-black roof. And inside? We composed a ‘luxe lodge’ esthetic with serious Mid Mod overtones. Don Draper eat your heart out. What better place than the cottage to imbibe an Old Fashioned cocktail?

As our transformative journey protracted, we added a whole new roof, an entire basement (did we mention we jacked the 30 ton house 20 feet off the ground? You have to see that scene to believe it) a new kitchen, two new bathrooms and two new bedrooms. And, while we were at it, we added a cute four bunk bedded bunkie and a whole new elevation to accommodate a sunroom. Jeesh…

Colin and Justin - Cottage Bath

Photography by Brandon Barre

It’s been a massive project but we couldn’t be happier. Last time round, we bought with friends, but this time round we invested alone. It’s so lovely. And we’re so happy. But, by God, the epic transformation nearly killed us. See all the Season 2 action weekly, from Sunday, 22nd March, at 9pm on Cottage Life. The network is in FREE preview from today, Saturday the 21st. Enjoy!

For more info visit www.cabinpressure.tv

Colin and Justin are appearing live at The Cottage Life Show on Saturday, March 28th at 1:00 pm.

Southern Style

  • In a sheltered corner of the front porch, a hanging teak daybed with plentiful pillows becomes an inviting swing. Obsidian coloured paint for the floors and shutters combines playfully with melon coloured upholstery.
  • A pair of antique tête-à-tête sofas, an eighteenth-century mirror, and a chandelier with cascading strands of ball chain provide the parlor with a sexy, sophisticated air.
  • Homeowners Lisa and Vincent West were enamoured of the simple style of the cottage and the airy atmosphere of its high ceilings and two-story porch. It’s very much a traditional Lowcountry house.
  • At the suggestion of interior designers Carter Kay and Nancy Hooff, the dropped ceiling was removed, exposing the original longleaf pine joists and trusses. In addition to lending a casual appearance to the room, the change also draws attention to the solidity and integrity of the house’s original construction.
  • Primitive creamware jugs and convex mirrors are among the few decorative accessories in the room where a scenic mural painted by Bob Christian provides the art.
  • In keeping with the client’s pared-down vision, the designers commissioned a twelve-foot-long table made from worn but polished reclaimed chestnut boards, complementing the unpainted wood of the ceiling and mantel. Chairs consist of casual wicker with linen slipcovered headchairs.
  • In a small bedroom, the designers created an airy look with contemporary metal beds that recall the tall canopy frames of traditional plantation-style beds. The sheen of quilted polished cotton pillow shams and comforters contrasts with the room’s natural linen coverlets and seagrass rug.

Isle of Hope, a tiny island outside Savannah, is an enchanted place with quiet streets, charming cottages, no streetlights and quaint oak trees blowing in the southern breeze. What’s your hurry?

Sit a spell.

“The house told us what it wanted us to do.”

Photography by Susan Sully from Houses with Charm.

 

Family Cottage

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Ready to update his 1920s family cottage, Mark Narsansky turned to his designer and longtime partner Philip Mitchell for help. How did Philip create more space to host more and larger family gatherings while preserving the cottage’s vintage personality?

This family cottage plays host to many guests on a frequent basis. Designer Philip Mitchell says, ‘The layout of the furniture helps to ease traffic flow in the living room.’

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To accommodate large dinner parties, Philip chooses a table that extends to seat 26 guests, perfect for holidays, birthdays and special events. A distressed finish means there’s no drama if children or pets accidentally scratch the surface.

To read and view the full home tour, check out Family Cottage, Issue 3 July/Aug 2011.

Family Cottage

  • The graciously renovated cottage hosts frequent and large gatherings.
  • LEFT French doors lead from the living room to patio and adjacent sandy beach.
  • The linen window treatments from Kravet play a dual role: they cool the air in summer by controlling light levels while adding visual and physical warmth during the winter months.
  • A banquette is a practical addition to the space, providing more seating in the smallest possible footprint. Plus, overnight guests can sleep on the window seat as its dimensions are similar to two single beds. “When the beaming sun and cottage snacks conspire to make sleepy guests,” laughs Philip, “I find this the perfect spot for a catnap.”
  • The nautical candle sconce from the Bombay Company was electrified to provide ambient lighting.
  • To accommodate large dinner parties, Philip chose a dining table that extends to serve 26 guests, perfect for holidays, birthdays and special events. A distressed finish means there’s no drama if children or pets accidentally scratch the surface. A sideboard with inset marble inlays accommodates hot serving dishes.
  • Other traditional accents include a vintage chandelier which gives off a warm glow above and reclaimed antique floors.
  • In the ensuite, Bianco Carerra marble optimizes light and offers an easy-to-live-with surface that ages gracefully.
  • An eclectic display of crocks sits atop an antique storage cabinet. The sconce is a vintage gas lantern. The turn-of-the-century Canadian landscape painting sits against cream wainscoting and below soft gray-green on the walls.
  • Vintage florals drape the bed with its crisp white sheets in the second floor master bedroom.
  • The roofline dictates an unusual angle above the vintage headboard from Patina Antiques. Twin ottomans in slate blue fabric rest at the foot of the bed.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIM McGHIE

Far from the hectic pace of Toronto and nestled along the northern shores of Lake Erie is the tiny town of Wainfleet. An idyllic spot to spend summer weekends and holidays surrounded by lake and land. Ready to update his 1920s family cottage, Mark Narsansky turned to his designer at PDX Renovations – Housebuyers Portland, and longtime partner Philip Mitchell for help.

Today, the refurbished cottage boasts ample room for entertaining family, friends and even frequent overnight guests. But that isn’t how it started out. The challenge for transforming Mark’s childhood vacation home was to rework the footprint to accommodate larger gatherings while preserving the cottage’s vintage personality.

To maximize seating for evening and weekend gatherings, the bright and cozy living room is smartly laid out with comfy sofas, plump armchairs and large coffee and occasional tables. A long pillow-topped banquette borders the front windows. Fabrics are a mixture of durable woven textures and kicky cottage stripes and prints.

All kitchen tools—pots, pans, plates and cooking utensils—are easy to grab from the storage shelves on the island and the wrought iron racks hanging above. Architectural trim details, vintage lighting and hardware are inspired by the cottage’s original 1920s architecture. The island features a marble surface, ideal for baking as well as sturdy counter space. Cabinetry finishes are hand painted and, if they chip, can easily be touched up.

The cottage has three additional bedrooms on the newly built second floor, though there is nary a bulge on the cottage exterior to reflect the change. Why? “Because the rooms are tucked behind the roofline and concealed behind discreet shed dormers,” responds Philip. Clever.

Philip was eager to replace dark stained walls from the original design with light-reflecting warm colours such as soft green, grey and cream. Philip says he’s a fan of mixing different finishes—from stained and painted wood to forged iron, it makes the space so much more interesting.

Philip sums up the renovation this way, “Our cottage is still full of 1920s details and is primed for the demands of the millennium lifestyle.”