Eastern Exposure

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Eastern exposure provides the bright, yellow sunlight we all crave come February. Upbeat and exuberant eastern exposures are ideal for playrooms, kitchens and breakfast nooks.

Pros:
  • Sunlight elevates mood. Most people prefer sunshine pouring through windows.
  • Plentiful light works well for rooms full of activity. Kitchens, playrooms, living rooms.
Cons:
  • Strong sunlight can destroy delicate fabrics with silk being the most susceptible. Lining the draperies or a simple window treatment made from gauze, linen or sheer fabric will diffuse the strongest light and offer some protection to other textiles in the room.
  • Intense sunlight can cause glare and reflection issues. When we moved into our new condo we had just that problem. Surrounded by windows and high in the sky, we had intense sunlight pouring in. The previous owners mirrored the kitchen backsplash and you literally could not be in that room when the sun was most intense.
Colour Cue:
  • To enhance sunlight, warm, pale colours such as pink, coral, yellow or white.
  • To temper intense sunlight, cool, pale colours such as blue, green or white.
  • White works well in east facing rooms.

Paint Recommendations:
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Western Exposures

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A room with western exposures receives limited, late afternoon sun light. Although fading light is weak, it can still have a warm glow to it.

Pros:
  • Limited glare. Like north facing.
  • The mellow glow of southern light visually warms rooms. Very desirable locations.
Cons:
  • Intense mid-day light can cause glare and eye strain. As with eastern exposures.
  • Weak light lacks sparkle and can be psychologically depressing. As with eastern exposures.
Colour Cue:
  • Contrasting colour schemes work well. For example green and cream work well in western exposures because the light tends to mute whatever colour is present.
  • Afternoon sunlight casts a pink glow, which affects other colours in a room. Blues take on a mauve cast, yellows may turn orange and greens turn brown.
  • Reds absorb light, making them richer, less flat. Making them a good choice especially for rooms that require drama and intimacy such as dining rooms. Deeper colours create a welcoming, cozy and intimate setting.
  • Complementary colours are mellowed. Complementary colours such as green and red intensify one another. In limited light such as Western or Northern exposure this affect is mellowed. The colours are not quite as garish.

Paint Recommendations:
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Southern Exposure

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Southern exposure is coveted because the daylight lasts so long on this side of the house. The sunlight makes its way from intense white light to lingering warmth as the sun moves in the sky. While white walls look great in sunlight, they take on a creamy look when bathed in much-coveted southern sunlight. So, you’ll want to watch for undertones of yellow if you are aiming for a gray or blue white

Pros:
  • Long lasting sunshine elevates mood. Similar to east facing rooms.
  • The mellow glow of southern light visually warms rooms. Very desirable locations.
Cons:
  • Intense mid-day light can cause glare and eye strain. As with eastern exposures.
Colour Cue:
  • Rich blues and greens lose intensity but can appear to glow. Therefore, when I want a full, rich blue or green for a southern exposure I may dial up my choice — pick something just a little more intense. To compensate for the loss of intensity.
  • Browns appear less somber in a south facing rooms. I love chocolate and mink browns. They work really well in southern and even eastern exposures because the yellow emphasis in sunlight brings out the red tones, which are the basis for brown.
  • Window walls appear darker, as they only receive reflected light. Therefore, if you are choosing paint colour make sure to see your sample throughout the space.
  • Mid-tone colours look fresh in the daytime, become richer at night. One of my favorite things about southern exposures.

Paint Recommendations:
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