Bar Cart DIY

A retro Salton Hot Table is rescued from oblivion—returned to a life of purposeful, colourful service.

Dabble Post

MATERIALS REQUIRED
Serving or bar cart (aka, a good find)
2 Colours of Spray Paint – Outdoor/Indoor – Krylon – gloss
Mod Podge
Paint Brush
Wrapping Paper

CURBSIDE CLASSIC
Always pay attention to the road ahead, but keep an eye on the curb for treasures that may be abandoned.

OLD TO GOLD
Using metallic gold Krylon spray paint, evenly coat all exposed metal parts, including the wheels and black rubber tires. Paint the rest of the cart in a contrasting colour.

MOD REVIVAL
Mod Podge is a gift to DIY’ers who long to turn objects into decoupage treasures. Select a decorative wrapping paper and cut to fit the required areas. Use a paintbrush to coat the bottom of the tray and place wrapping paper on its surface. Smooth out any bubbles with your hands and apply another coat of the Mod Podge over wrapping paper to seal the surface. Let dry overnight.

Dabble Savvy: Poke holes in air bubbles with a needle, smooth with a paintbrush.

From Issue 15 – May 2014 

Bottle Service – Transforming an Old Bar Cart

Spring has sprung and so have yard sales, or as I like to call it, “Stop the car” season! Keep your eyes peeled for treasures because you never know what you will find on the side of the curb and at an early morning garage sale.

While driving through my neighborhood,  I spotted a bar cart at the side of the road. To my satisfaction, it was a retro Salton Hot Table – a popular item in the 60s and 70s for keeping plates hot. The cart was in amazing shape and I was thrilled someone threw it away.

Before

I instantly envisioned a colourful bar cart for serving refreshing summer cocktails during dinner parties. The hot table component was easily removed by cutting the electrical cord and removing four mounting screws from the wood support on the sides.

Once removed, I measured the opening and got a new piece of wood cut at a big box store to fit the inside bottom and reused the middle wood bracket for maximum support. The wood areas were painted lime green and the metal hardware was painted gold. I cut a piece of lime green faux snakeskin wrapping paper to fit the bottom of the trays using Modge Podge to secure and protect the paper.

After

Read the step-by-step instructions in the May 2014 issue of Dabble.

A Tour of the White House

Image Credit White House Museum

Image Credit White House Museum

American royalty, the White House is arguably the most iconic home in the US.

1.5 million visitors tour the White House each year, but they see only a handful of the 140+ ground and mansion areas. It is broken down into three sections, the East Wing where the Emergency Operations Center resides, the West Wing, where the Situation room is, and the Residence, a four-story living space.

In total, the White House has 132 rooms, including 16 family-guest rooms, 1 main kitchen, 1 diet kitchen, 1 family kitchen, and 35 bathrooms totaling approximately 55,000 sq.ft. It also features 412 doors, 147 windows, 28 fireplace mantels, 8 staircases, and 3 elevators.

During the War of 1812, the White House was completely demolished by fire with most of the valuables being ransacked by British troops, leaving only the exterior walls standing. President Madison hired architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe and Hoban to lead the charge on the rebuilding project. When Teddy Roosevelt came to office in 1902, he decided the White House needed to be expanded and modernized due to overcrowding and an outdated appearance. He selected McKim, Mead & White to remove the Tiffany screen and all Victorian additions and replace everything with a neoclassical style that wasn’t popular with most subsequent Presidents.

Out of respect for the historical value of the house, no substantive architectural changes have been made since, but many have taken turns redecorating and refurbishing to make the residence more in tune with their personal style. Jackie Kennedy, who decorated all the rooms by theme and periods of world history, made some of the most significant changes.

We’re here to give you a quick tour of some of the most interesting interior design features of America’s first family.

Blue Room
The center of the State Floor, the Blue Room is known for its breathtaking view over the South Lawn and oval shape, the perfect area to receive guests. The elliptical saloon was decorated in the French Empire style by President Monroe with its most striking element an early 19th century gilded-wood and glass chandelier encircled with acanthus leaves. Blue satin geometric draperies are hung with a border of gold rosettes that match an equally extravagant carpet. Furnishings are heavily corniced and the ceiling is painted in fresco, adding to the richness of the space.

The Blue Room

The Blue Room, 2009 (Image Credit: Reuters)

Oval Office
The President’s formal workspace, the Oval Office has hosted a number of important diplomats, dignitaries and heads of state through the years. Each President has decorated the room to suit his tastes, but the most consistent features that remain include a white marble mantel that’s been there since 1909, two flags, and the famous Presidential seal on the ceiling.

The Oval Office

The Oval Office, 2010 (Image Credit BBC – Reuters)

Vermeil Room
Also known as the “Gold Room,” the Vermeil room serves as a display room and, for formal occasions, a ladies sitting room. More subtle and feminine than most of the other rooms, soft yellow paneled walls accent a collection of vermeil, gold-plated silver, a gift from Margaret Thompson Biddle. The carpet is a Turkish Hereke from around 1860, chosen for its pale green background and gold silk hues. Other prominent accents include early 19th century mahogany pieces like a circular table and a pier table, plus an impressive ten-armed cut-glass chandelier and scroll sofa.

The Vermeil Room

Vermeil Room, 2008 (Image Credit: Architectural Digest)

 

Green Room
Originally envisioned to be the “Common Dining Room,” the Green Room has served many purposes over the years from lodging to entertaining. Still featuring green water silk-lined fabric chosen by the Kennedys in 1971, draperies of striped beige, green and coral satin adorn the walls of the Presidential Parlor. All the accessories are gilded and ornate including a pair of hand-carved American eagles, a favorite decorative motif of the Federal period.

The Green Room

Green Room, 2008 (Image Credit: Architectural Digest)

Lincoln Bedroom

In a room Lincoln never actually slept in, the Lincoln Bedroom is part of a suite of rooms that hosts overnight guests and political supporters. It has been furnished in Victorian style since the Truman renovation and is rumored to be haunted. Famous furniture includes a commanding 8 by 6’ rosewood bed with canopy, slipper chairs, sofa, and cabinet chairs. Featured prominently on the desk is one of only five holographic copies of the Gettysburg Address. The room was updated in 2004 with an opulent white marble mantel, canopy carved in the shape of a crown, and deep emerald green, yellow and purple draperies.

Lincoln's Bedroom, 2007 (Image Credit: Newsweek - Gary Fabiano)

Lincoln’s Bedroom, 2007 (Image Credit: Newsweek – Gary Fabiano)

Gold Rush

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“All that glitters is bound to find its way into Dabble,” says our style expert Christine Da Costa. Gold, brass and bronze are home design attention grabbers.

US$1,098 Anthropologie
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Arteriors Baroque Antique Gold Leaf Lidded Box
US$250, Zhush
www.zhush.com

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Read the entire article ‘What’s Trending – Gold’ in Issue 11 of Dabble.

What’s Trending: Grey & Yellow

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With fall in the air our nesting instinct kicks in. ‘Ward off the chill,’ says designer Christine DaCosta, ‘with the powerful pairing of yellow and grey.’

Featured Image: Jenna Bedding Collection, CA$35-$170, Urban Barn, www.urbanbarn.com

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 Vintage Yellow Glass Lamps, US$3900, Pieces, www.pieces.com

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 Tali Printed Shower Curtain, CA$40, West Elm, www.westelm.com

Read the entire article ‘What’s Trending – Grey&Yellow’ in Issue 10 of Dabble.

It’s 5 O’Clock Somewhere

  • The living room’s sectional sofa is covered in creamy, textured linen. Sitting adjacent is the iconic Platner chair and stool. “To me, the Platner series represents ultimate glamour,” the designer says.
  • Steven opted for Resene Marsale paints in industrial hues—like the dramatic charcoal seen here—to complement urban views.
  • Floor to ceiling glass, dynamic city views and overscaled accessories create a dramatic setting for dining.
  • Europeans were fascinated with the Far East during the time of explorer Marco Polo. A closer look at the cabinet's details reveal animated people in ornate dress and elephants in ceremonial costume.
  • The luxurious silk-panelled walls embrace the bedroom’s cozy ambience.

Perched high on the cliffs in the Brisbane suburb of New Farm, this penthouse condo with its stylish “cocktails-at-five” mood reflects the talents of Australian designer Steven Stewart. The quiet inner-city dwelling suits his client’s busy lifestyle. As a bonus, it’s also an ideal meeting spot for friends to gather before heading out for a late dinner at one of the area’s fabulous restaurants.

Spacious and airy, chic open-plan living and dining rooms lead to outdoor entertaining areas as well as stunning, unobstructed views of the city and its brightly lit Story Bridge.

Although it’s an optical illusion, it almost feels that the illuminated bridge—which crosses the Brisbane River, connecting the city’s northern and southern suburbs— is within easy reach.

In the dining room, eight alabaster leather chairs border the gleaming black table, ready to accommodate the owner’s frequent dinner parties. Two vintage Chinese vases from a local antiques dealer sit on top. “We purposely chose white vases to add a spark,” says Steven.

Despite its ultra-urban vibe, the burgeoning neighbourhood of New Farm gets its name from the city’s early years as a rural community. “Since this is the condo’s only penthouse,” says Steven, “it’s affectionately called the New Farm Penthouse.”

The towering metal sculpture, purchased by the owner in Italy, strikes a pose against Brisbane’s evening skies.

“Black and gold Chinoiserie provides a stunning backdrop to the luxury textiles and finishes,” says designer Steven Stewart.

A gleaming bar cabinet with glass shelves and mirror backing displays crystal wine goblets, ready to oblige a future soirée. The decorative details of the chinoiserie work beautifully against the dark and dramatic interior accents. Steven explains the term Chinoiserie is a French word that means ‘in the Chinese taste’ and describes a European style of decorative detail, wildly popular in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Clearly, it’s still fashionable today.

Bedroom walls are seductively panelled in a sophisticated silk textile, custom-dyed to match the paint finish on adjacent walls. Not only does the treatment create a cozy environment for sleeping, it’s an effective way to dampen noise as well. Underfoot is a cozy taupe carpet.

“Bedrooms don’t experience the same heavy use as say, the kitchen, so I took the opportunity to use more extravagant materials,” the designer enthuses.

In addition to carrying the home’s industrial colour scheme throughout, Steven introduces a Chinese motif on the decorative pillows to echo the chinoise elements throughout the condo. The faux fur throw adds a welcome layer of luxury.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KYLIE HOOD