Take 3: Herb

Dried or fresh? There’s only one answer for the enthusiastic home cook. Herbs from the garden (or the kitchen window sill) make the meal. Dabble’s in-house design team dug up three display worthy herb garden ideas.

ONE:

Beyond Basil
If you’re ready to go beyond basil it’s likely you need a large vessel to contain your choices. This rustic barrel inspired pot is ideal for a country setting.

Dabble Savvy: Starting with the vessel you want to fill simplifies the decision process when it’s time to purchase herbs.

Take 3 - Herb Garden

TWO:

Glass Hothouse 
Any glass container is ideally suited to hold an herb garden. The angled opening of this contemporary vase makes reaching in for clippings a snap…a snip?

Take 3 - Herb Garden 2

THREE:

Vintage Pots
If you crave order, you’ll love placing your herbs in individual pots.

Dabble Savvy: Use a label, such as the vintage tin ones seen here, as decoration or as a tool to teach children about herbs.

Take 3 - Herb Garden 3

 

Rotisserie Herb Prime Rib

A day with Rob Rainford - Dinner

Recipe by Chef Rob Rainford.

For maximum flavor allow the prime rib to sit in the thyme rub overnight, but don’t apply the salt until just before you start to cook it.

 

INGREDIENTS:

6 tbsp finely chopped fresh thyme

10 cloves garlic, pushed through a garlic press

2 tbsp finely chopped fresh rosemary

2 tbsp finely chopped fresh oregano

Freshly cracked black pepper to taste

7 to 10 lbs bone-in prime rib roast

1/4 cup grapeseed oil (or just enough to coat the prime rib)

Kosher salt to taste

 

INSTRUCTIONS:

Stir together the thyme, garlic, rosemary, oregano and pepper. Rub the prime rib all over with the oil then coat with the thyme mixture. Refrigerate overnight.

Fire up your charcoal grill or preheat your gas grill and prep the grill for using the rotisserie.

Grilling temp should be around 325°F (160°C). For charcoal grilling, you’re ready to grill when a thick white ash has appeared on the coals. Move most of the hot coals to the middle of the grill and place a few on either side to create heat in the middle of the grill where the meat will be rotating.

Rub the prime rib with salt to taste and load it onto the rotisserie rod, doing your best to center the roast. Finger tighten the rotisserie forks on either side of the prime rib (you may have to use a pair of pliers to tighten the forks securely).

If you’re using a gas grill, place a drip pan directly on the grates in the middle section of the grill. This will help to catch any fats that drip from the prime rib. You can place a little water in the bottom of the drip pan to help create a moist environment if you wish. Just remember you will be cooking with the lid closed for about 1 ó to 2 hours, depending on how you like your meat.

Put the rotisserie rod on the grill, making sure the rod is secure. Close the lid, set the motor speed to low, then let your grill do the rest of the work. A good rule of thumb is to cook the prime rib for 20 minutes per pound (500 g). For medium-rare meat, you will be looking for an internal temperature of 135°F (57°C).

Once your prime rib is done to your liking, take it off the rotisserie and let it sit for 10 to 15 minutes before slicing it.

Serves 8
For more recipes by Chef Rob Rainford, pick up a copy of his latest book Born to Grill.