Fegatini: Tuscan Chicken Liver Spread

Fegatini2_7852

Recipe and photograph by Amber Share.

“Fegatini is the paté of Tuscany. It is served everywhere, especially at aperitivo, and each cook makes it slightly differently.”

 

Serves 8

Prep Time 30 min.

Preheat 400°F

 

INGREDIENTS:

1/2 lb. chicken livers

1/2 yellow onion, diced

1 carrot, diced

1 celery, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 tbsp tomato paste

3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1/4 cup water

1/3 cup Vin Santo

3 tbsp capers, rinsed

3/4 tsp fine sea salt + 2 pinches

black pepper, freshly ground

Extra olive oil and capers for garnish

1 baguette or loaf of Italian bread, sliced and cut into

cracker size pieces

 

INSTRUCTIONS:

Heat a wide frying pan over medium. Add olive oil, swirl around pan then add onion, carrot, celery and a couple pinches of salt. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add garlic, stir and cook another 2 minutes. Add livers and cook another 5 minutes, turning to brown the outsides.

Dilute tomato paste in the Vin Santo and water. Deglaze the pan with the liquid mixture. Add salt and freshly ground pepper to taste. Cook another 5 minutes, then remove from heat. Cool slightly.

Scrape down pan and transfer to a food processor, add capers and process until smooth. Drizzle in olive oil as needed to keep the mixture loose.

Brush bread with olive oil and toast on a cookie sheet in oven for 6-8 minutes.

Place the fegatini in small bowls, drizzle with olive oil and top with capers. Serve warm or at room temperature with the toasts.

App for That Pâté

There's an App - Pate

 

The App: Chicken Liver Pâté and Toasted Bread.

Jameson’s Pick: Pierre-Marie Chermette Domaine du Vissoux Cuvée Vielles Vignes Beaujolais 2009.

It’s hard to overstate the comforting decadence of a beautifully made pâté. Is it only the heartiest wines that can handle this French classic?

Absolutely not. Surprisingly, a lighter-style red with some zip, like a well-made Beaujolais, easily cuts through all that richness. And when you have some traditional accompaniments like cornichons or spicy mustard, often a wine that has a good amount of acidity is the perfect bridge from the substantial pâté to its refreshing complements.

The quality of Beaujolais from producers like Chermette makes me want to beat the drum for drinking Beaujolais year-round. Cru Beaujolais cellars beautifully, if you have the strength to resist its considerable charms. (The bottle pictured is the Nouveau, which drinks surprisingly well, but I recommend the Cuvée Traditionnelle Vieilles Vignes as an introduction to Chermette’s wines to enjoy while your Crus are tucked away for a few years.
App for that - Pate2