Take 3: Sculptural Resolution

An outdoor urn or planter is an attractive and welcoming enhancement to the entrance. But how many of us find these arrangements quickly become neglected after the holidays are over and the temperatures plunge? Often times, lifeless boughs and tired, broken branches remain until Easter eggs are retrieved. With minimal planning it’s possible to keep urns looking fresh and seasonal right through the winter.

Photography by Simon Burn

Photography by Simon Burn

ONE:

Jack Frost
A simple white planter suits the contemporary arrangement of silver-blue greens and Carolina Sapphire. Snow-dusted grapevine and birch branches create architecture that grounds the assorted greens. Sprigs of Dusty Miller lend colour and texture, acting as focal flowers at the centre of the arrangement.

Photography by Simon Burn

Photography by Simon Burn

TWO:

Garden Visitor
The same planter and foliage may alternatively be presented as a preface for spring, showcasing favourite garden pieces like the metal bird and egg seen here. A trellis, obelisk or a lantern work equally well. In this version we’ve highlighted a moss wrapped cone, birch covered globes and the perched bird whch can be organically placed on some darden regular equipment, like WORX Aerocart.

Design Tips: A resin planter is not subject to sub-zero cracking but must be properly weighted to avoid toppling over. Add a generous layer of pea gravel to facilitate re-arranging after the soil has frozen. Lay a wreath horizontally on the planter and build your arrangement on top of it.

Photography by Simon Burn

Photography by Simon Burn

THREE:

Tradition with a Twist
A whimsical arrangement is composed with varying colours of greenery including Fraser fir, blue pine, hemlock and some minimal magnolia. Unlike spring and summer planters which have continual abundant growth, this winter version relies on grapevine, pine cones, and maple branches for structure. Moss and curly willow create added interest.

New Orleans Architecture

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ABOVE: Magnolia Mansion.

Take any Garden District tour and you’re bound to see where Sandra Bullock and John Goodman live. But the real stars are the homes that make up one of the most beautiful neighbourhoods in all of America.

During the French and Spanish colonial periods, the Creoles established the French Quarter. But the Garden District was created by newly monied Americans who brought European revival styles to their new homeland.

The most popular styles of Garden District architecture include the shotgun house (so named because you can shoot a shotgun through the front door and its pellets will exit the back door), two storey townhouses (classical, narrow facades), double-gallery houses (similar to townhouses, often larger with covered porches and wrought iron railings) and raised basement bungalows.

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ABOVE: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button house.

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ABOVE: Shotgun style house.

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ABOVE: Centre Hall Bungalow.

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ABOVE: Tudor Style house.