Guide to New Town in Prague

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Wenceslas Square
Václavské námestí

A sweeping avenue developed in the 14th century, Wenceslas Square is rarely deserted, but an easy stroll nets a vast selection of shops and restaurants to enjoy. At its apex is the National Museum, seen just behind the statue of Duke Wenceslas on horseback. (It seems the Christmas carol gave him a boost in title.)

Eat

At tea time head to the splendidly restored Grand Café Orient (Ovocný trh 19) to get a feel for 1912 Prague. Or, visit Municipal House Café for a light lunch in an exquisite Art Nouveau setting.

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Sit in the wine bar and soak up the urban contemporary vibe while nibbling contentedly at KOGO’s Slovanský Dum location (Na Pr.kope 22). Or, descend into the cellared depths of Klub Architektu (Betlemske Namesti 5a) for hearty Czech fare at great prices.

Shop

Decorative arts enthusiasts go ga-ga over the tableware, books, furniture and writing papers on display (and in the gift shop) at the Kubistz Museum, located inside the House of the Black Madonna.

The city’s only Moser store, creating the finest Czech crystal since 1857 is their flagship (Na Prikope 12). A must visit.

If you’ve been to Paris you are familiar with shopping passages that house stores and restaurants. Lucerna Pasáž is a popular Czech passage but most of the shops still have a communist-era feel to them. In contrast, Pasáž Slovanský Dum (Na Pr.kope 22), has a branch of the Belgian design shop Flamant Store, clothing stores such as Mexx and Tommy Hilfiger, and a movie theatre with English subtitles.

Prague’s Performing Arts

Attending a concert in Prague is a memorable experience. There are dozens of locations where you can enjoy orchestras, ensembles, theatre and comedy. Performances change frequently so read the literature available at each location.

1-2-3 Days in Prague

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“Once you’ve exhausted your comfortable walking shoes, take the reins of a horse drawn carriage and explore Old Town and New Town with a private guide.”

Day 1

MORNING While you’re fresh, head to the top of the city and begin your day at Prague Castle. There are a dozen noteworthy buildings and sites.

NOON Nearing lunch time? Head to the Strahov Monastic Brewery. Afterwards, take time to enjoy the Theological Library and gift shop.

AFTERNOON When it’s time to head back down the hill, take a stroll along popular Neruda Street. You may want to take a short detour to see John Lennon’s Peace Wall if you are not going to spend additional time in Lesser Town during your stay.

EVENING Make a reservation at Hergetova Cihelná (Ciheln. 2b) where the riverside seating and passing boats provide a moving dinner show.

Day 2

MORNING Start early in the Jewish Quarter as it’s easy to spend a full day touring exhibits.

NOON Stop for a quick lunch at King Solomon Restaurant (Širok. 7/37) which touts itself as ‘Madonna’s very own kosher bakery’ and then continue strolling down Parížská where, with cash in hand, you may be able to do more than window shop.

AFTERNOON Rent a bike from Praha Bike Tours and Rental for an afternoon tour around the city’s sites. Afterwards, stop at a local pub, like U Vejvodu, for a hard-earned pilsner.

EVENING You simply must take in a concert to fully appreciate Prague’s immersion in the classical arts. Kimberley’s picks? The more intimate venues of Lichtenstein Palace, home of the Music Faculty of the Academy of Performing Arts, or the Neo-Classical Estates Theatre.

Day 3

MORNING After so much sightseeing you may be ready for a leisurely day of shopping. The term bohemian is synonymous with individual style and that’s what you’ll find on Dlouhá Street. Start with a visit to Coffee Fellows (20 Dlouh.). Great coffee and decadent pastries should fortify you for the day ahead.

Still have energy to shop? While Palladium (n.mest. Republiky 1) is a huge indoor mall with more than 200 stores, the real fun is shopping Prague’s lively streets—Na Prikope, U Prasné brány and Mostecká.

EVENING After a day on your feet, book passage on the Jazz Boat which docks near Cechuv Bridge on the Old Town side. Enjoy a peaceful cruise up the Vltava River with live music to serenade you.

Architecture in New Town, Prague

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Nové Město

 

Architecture enthusiasts are sure to enjoy a trip to Prague, where they’ll find Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Neo-Classical, Art Nouveau, Cubist and Communist style buildings on display. New Town is ideal location to start the tour.

Cubism

I realize the word unique is grossly overused, but how else to describe a style of architecture that can be found in only one place on earth? In the 20th century, Czech architects and designers expanded the lessons of Picasso and Braque into architecture and decorative arts. While academia is divided on whether or not this style actually exists, we can contemplate its merits at the House of the Black Madonna Dum u Cerné matky boží. Originally constructed as a department store in 1912, its namesake statue is still firmly affixed behind the golden grill at the corner of this New Town destination.

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Art Nouveau

Follow the signs to Republic Square Námestí Republiky and the magnificent Art Nouveau Municipal House Obecní dum (above) is easy to spot. The landmark building, dating from 1905, is capped by a distinctive half-domed roof and intricate mosaics. Inside, there are murals from Prague’s most famous painters including Alfons Mucha whose style is instantly recognizable.

Dabble Savvy

While there is a dedicated Alfons Mucha Museum, it’s out of the way and strictly for those who love his work. Instead, wander into the public areas of Municipal House to see the Art Nouveau painter’s legacy.

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Neo-Classicism

Behind its lyrical green facade is the smallest of the city’s opera houses. With only 600 seats, albeit clad in luxurious blue velvet, The Estates Theatre (above) is a symbol of Prague’s artistic heritage. This New Town theatre is most famous as the venue where Mozart first performed his “Don Giovanni” in 1787.