Issue 21 – DecJan’15

Infusion on Cityline

Featured

Set provided by Casalife, Photo on Santa Monica by Simon Burn

 

Don’t miss Cityline Thursday, August 28th. Kimberley shows viewers how to use art and photography to help choose furnishings and accessories.

Dabble Chef: seared tuna

Photography by Simon Burn

Photography by Simon Burn

Spicy Mayo

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 tbsp Sambal sauce (chili sauce)
  • ½ cup mayonnaise

DIRECTIONS:
Mix ingredients together in a small mixing bowl. Set in fridge until serving.

Sesame Crusted Tuna

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 pieces sushi grade tuna
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 cup onions, julienne
  • 1 cup red peppers, julienne
  • 1 cup green peppers, julienne
  • 1 cup celery, julienne
  • 1 cup carrots, julienne
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 1 orange, zest and juice
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh ginger
  • 2 tbsp sesame seed oil
  • 1 baby bok choy, washed and julienne
  • 1 cup of black or white sesame seeds
  • ½ cup cilantro, washed and chopped

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Season tuna with salt and pepper.
  2. Pour the sesame seeds on a plate and roll the tuna edges in the seeds, making sure to cover all sides. If seeds are not sticking, cover the tuna with a tablespoon of olive oil before rolling.
  3. Ina large sauté pan, heat the olive oil until it reaches its smoking point and then add tuna.
  4. Sear the tuna for approximately 2 minutes on each side and remove from pan. Set the tuna on a plate with a paper towel.
  5. Return the pan to the heat. Add onions, peppers, celery and carrots, then sauté for 5 minutes.
  6. Add garlic, orange zest and juice, ginger and sesame oil, continually stirring. Remove the pan from the heat and add bok choy.
  7. Slice tuna on a bias (4-5 pieces per serving). Plate the vegetables and fan tuna pieces on top. Pour the remaining liquid from the vegetables over the tuna and add a generous dollop of spicy mayo. Garnish with cilantro and serve.

Tip: Wash the bok choy thoroughly to remove any grit.

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Barcelona’s Top 5 Restaurants

“Reset your body clock,” advises Dabble’s principal photographer, Simon Burn. “Locals never eat dinner before 10:00 pm, which leaves plenty of time to enjoy several meals each day.”

Nearly every restaurant in Barcelona suffers from mixed reviews when it comes to service. Frankly, how attentive the wait staff is depends largely on the day. Be patient and go with the flow if you want to have a good time.

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1. In the Barri Gòtic neighbourhood of Barcelona is the city’s oldest (and most delicious according to Simon) restaurant, Can Culleretes. For a set price, diners enjoy a three course meal plus wine in a rich, warm setting. Try the seafood which tastes fresh from the sea or the more hearty roasted duck with prunes.

2. Grab a spot at the bar if you can because the popular Cal Pep only has five tables. The Born neighbourhood haunt is packed with hungry locals who sometimes sneak in the back door. The cuttlefish and garbanzo beans can only be described as perfect.

3. Spanish for skylight, Tragaluz offers moonlight dining to those lucky enough to secure a table on the second floor. A passion for good food continually inspires the owner Rosa Esteva and her son Tomas to create fresh fare for a crowd that returns frequently.

Barcelona 19

4. Placed in tandem (Fishop at the front and Beefshop at the back) are sister restaurants—though these relatives look nothing alike. Fish and sushi are served raw at tables with industrial seating, while the beef menu is served in cozy armchairs near a stone fireplace.

Dabble Savvy: On the last Monday of the month there’s a 35€ all you can eat menu that includes wine.

5. Food show fans drool at the mere mention of molecular gastronomy. Since elBulli is temporarily closed it’s high season for Comerç, 24. Dining in this fashion is a unique experience. The food items, served in seven courses, are complex creations. Sit near the kitchen and watch the culinary ballet as several chefs work together on each dish. Dinner for one with two glasses of wine came to 105€.

Southern Belle

  • Designer, Lucinda Robinson, stands in the doorway of the 50s bungalow she decorated for downtown clients in Charleston. In addition to interior design, Lucinda is an established clothing designer. She models a dress from her popular Lucinda Eden shop, located on King St. in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • Green subway tiles on the double-sided fireplace are original to the home, providing colour inspiration throughout. The wool and sisal carpet from GDC home embraces the living room seating and offers the homeowners the comfort they desired.
  • In the dining room, the upholstered chairs from Vanguard Furniture are covered in white, washable suede. The reliable fabric holds up to heavy use, ideally suiting the homeowners’ lifestyle as they are frequent entertainers. Lucinda’s personal favourite in the room is the custom trestle table made by an artisan in North Car olina. A reproduction chandelier from Currey and Co. complements the dark wood tones in the dining table, sideboard and floor.
  • Though the welcoming foyer is mostly neutral, its colour scheme is brightened with the apple coloured lamp from GDC Home which sits on an antique table—a family heirloom.

It’s a southern revival for this 2,000 square foot, 3 bedroom Arts and Crafts bungalow in downtown Charleston thanks to designer Lucinda Robinson.

Having designed the client’s previous homesa traditional single house and a country estateLucinda easily transitioned Kristy Anderson and family to the smaller bungalow without sacrificing function or style.

Since the south is all about hospitality, the home is family-friendly and ready to receive guests at any time. If you are in the market for some beautiful furniture I suggest checking out Wellington’s Leather Furniture.

Sweet Home à la Savannah

  • LEFT: Southerners revere hospitality, according to interior designer Lynn Morgan. Her historic Savannah row house clearly has its own open door policy. RIGHT: The foyer’s gilded Federal style mirror keeps a watchful eye on the well-appointed living room.
  • Sunlight pours through dramatic six-over-six, double sash windows, filling the gracious living room with an inviting warmth.
  • The kitchen’s beadboard, painted in pale blue, extends from the countertop upwards and into the glass display cabinets, providing a subtly colourful backdrop to dishes on display. To ground the busy kitchen and its painted surfaces, Lynn introduced dark stained, oak countertops.
  • Playful green upholstered chairs with white, contrast piping gather round the painted dining table.
  • Lynn’s fondness for Caribbean colour finds its way into her sun-filled master bedroom. A crisp white coverlet, cashmere throw and downy pillows provide the layers of comfort required for sleeping. The bedroom walls are painted Benjamin Moore’s Mountain Mist.
  • Adjacent to sleeping quarters is a gracious dressing room, separated by glass doors. The frosted panes soften filtering sunlight.
  • High-gloss white paint draws attention to the handsome baseboards and trim throughout, especially when contrasted with the matte finish used on walls.

Set in Savannah’s historic oak-lined district, the Greek Revival row house was originally built in 1853, likely a family home for a successful shipping magnate. Determined to strike her own pose with the redecoration project, Lynn Morgan was unencumbered by the home’s luminous past.

Instead, she created a thoroughly American interior by hitting the proverbial “refresh” button. Rather than rely exclusively on French and English antiques, the designer incorporated found pieces, painted furniture and humble garden elements, creating an easy, welcoming mix. Lacquered white furniture, saturated colour and bold graphics infuse the public spaces with joyful energy.

Striking pattern is used strategically to create interest in key areas—most notably the checkerboard floor pattern in the kitchen, the bold stripes in the dining room area carpet and the blue zigzag ottoman in the living room. Subtle pattern, like the beadboard in the kitchen and the sisal area carpet in the living room, creates texture and provides a foil to glossier finishes.

Dabble Savvy: Use a dark lampshade, like the royal blue bedside lamp with a narrow opening at the top and wider opening at the bottom, to force light onto the surface of a good book (as seen in the Master Bedroom).

Lynn’s Style Tips

Keep it simple. Glamour and sophistication go hand in hand with simplicity. Lynn suggests removing something from every finished room.

Mix it up. Texture and depth are byproducts of contrast. Mixing finishes—lacquered trim and matte walls, sisal carpets and high-gloss wood floors—enlivens a scheme.

Be an original. Don’t feel compelled to follow the past. Be fearless and set a contemporary tone that speaks to you personally.

Paint it white. For striking architecture or furniture with great bones, a coat of paint is transformative.

 

Spanish Eyes

  • Wrought iron balusters grace the foyer’s tiled staircase.
  • Various objet d’art and collectibles rest on surfaces throughout the spacious living room. A formidable and eclectic art collection adorns the room’s walls.
  • LEFT: The coffee table has a balustrade base and its top is edged in marble which surrounds a terra cotta field. RIGHT: At the bar, crystal glasses rest on a chest decorated with marquetry.
  • The panelled study enjoys uninterrupted views to the foyer and into the dining room. Its coffered ceiling creates cozy intimacy in the warm setting.
  • In the dining room, a two-tiered crystal chandelier with acanthus leaves at the crown and antique bronze fittings softly illuminates the oval table. The table is surrounded by leather-clad dining chairs with tapestry backs.
  • Looking outside to the courtyard, dinner guests catch sight of the leafy lemon trees that are poised to flower and release their delicate scent.
  • A large candle chandelier floats above the kitchen island. When the temperature heats up, family and guests move into the shade of the adjoining patio.
  • From the kitchen, doors open onto a charming patio beneath an ivy-covered archway.

Marci Valner’s Spanish Colonial style home circa 1929 is minutes from UCLA in the urban suburb of Westwood. Jockeying for a parking spot is de rigueur in this neighbourhood. We see one, grab it and remember to hang the coveted permit from the rear view mirror or—ouch—a $64 ticket is sure to be waiting upon our return.

Although the home is formally designed it’s clearly well-loved and used frequently for entertaining. Patterned chairs and serviceable sofas invite lingering in the living room. Aubusson tapestry and vintage leaf patterns adorn pillows on the velvet sofa. An antique trestle side table sits next to the William Birch arm chair with its vintage palm leaf upholstery.

In the kitchen, cool-to-the-touch terra cotta floors offer a respite from the day’s heat. White adobe plaster walls and rustic wood beams on the ceiling add to the 1920’s mood.

We are in no hurry to rush back to our parking spot and take a moment to rest on the patio’s cool tile steps.