A Taste of Kah’wah (Turkish Coffee)

Turkey

Turkish Coffee

Turkish coffee (or Kah’wah) is thick, intense and all about the foamy layer that sits atop its rich, chocolate coloured depths. Made in long-handled pots originally designed to brew coffee over the hot desert sand, the hint of cardamom brings a suggestion of the Middle East to this bold brew. Since Turkish coffee is not filtered, be careful not to drink the grounds in the bottom of your cup, which are traditionally turned out into a saucer and used to tell fortunes.

 

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup water

1 tbsp medium roast coffee, extra fine grind

1/8 tsp ground cardamom or 1 cardamom pod

1-2 tbsp sugar to taste

Special Equipment

Turkish coffee pot (a cezve or ibrik)

Demitasse cups to serve

 

INSTRUCTIONS:

Combine all ingredients in Turkish coffee pot or a small saucepan. Stir over low heat until sugar is dissolved.

Watching carefully to avoid boiling over, bring coffee to a simmer over medium heat. Remove pan from heat when surface is covered with foam.

Using a large spoon, scoop up foam and divide between serving cups. Place coffee back on heat and reheat until surface is covered with foam again. Repeat this process for a third time to create more foam.

Pour remaining coffee slowly into cups to avoid breaking foam, and leave grounds in pan. Let coffee sit for one minute until grounds settle. Discard cardamom pod if using. Serve at once.

Serve with: A little pillow of Turkish delight and a tall glass of water.

Ask your barista to grind beans for Turkish coffee.

Budapest Architecture: Buda

Budapest 8

Architecture buffs may find Budapest’s range of styles somewhat head-spinning.

Roman amphitheatres, Gothic and Neo-Gothic styled cathedrals, Turkish baths and Secessionist (Art Nouveau) buildings give the city an architectural ambiguity that only underscores its many charms.

1. Though the original Royal Palace with its Gothic and Renaissance foundations was destroyed and rebuilt many times, the Habsburgs built a completely new, small Baroque palace in the beginning of the 18th century. Today, Buda Castle (Kiralyi Palota) houses the largest collection of Hungarian fine art at its Hungarian National Gallery. Explore the gardens and nearby restaurants and make a half day of the visit.

Dabble Savvy: Had history been different, we might know the names of Hungarian artists as well as we know Monet, VanGogh and Picasso. Hire a guide to enjoy the impressive collections.

Dabble does Budapest5

ABOVE: Ernst Galeria owner Eleni Koranis strikes a pose beside a 1920s iron rocking chair from Vienna. Her Pest gallery specializes in furniture, paintings and ceramics from the turn of the 20th century.

2. A visit to the lobby of the Hilton Budapest Hotel nets a surprising glimpse into antiquity, as it’s built on top of the ruins of a medieval monastery. The UNESCO World Heritage Site is in the heart of the Buda Castle district, beside Fisherman’s Bastion and Matthias Church. If it’s time for lunch, the Icon Restaurant offers spectacular views of the Danube River, Chain Bridge and Hungarian Parliament building.

Dabble does Budapest45

ABOVE: Zsolnay ceramic vase.

3. Like so much of Hungary’s finest architecture, Matthias Church (Mátyástemplom) is a victim of various invasions. Perhaps the most devastating, a century and a half of Turkish occupation, resulted in the whitewashing of ornate frescoes and confiscation of the church’s ecclesiastical treasures. One of the most striking features from the 19th century restoration is the church’s ornamental roof, covered in pyrogranite ceramic tiles developed by Zsolnay.

Dabble Savvy: Father and son, Hungarian natives Miklós and Vilmos Zsolnay, received worldwide recognition for their porcelain and ceramics. The iridescent, frost-resistant tiles were a popular building material during the city’s prolific Art Nouveau period.

 

Take 3: Vanity Insanity

At first blush, a vanity table may seem like an outmoded, though elegant, means of dressing—something your grandma used. If you’re tired of leaning over the bathroom sink for a view of your face, retrieving your makeup brush from the wet bowl and leaving the house with a toothpaste stripe across your abdomen, it may be time to reconsider the ease of a dressing table. Dabble’s in-house design team offers three stylish solutions to make your morning makeup application anything but routine.

Photography by Simon Burn

ONE:

Formal Evening Wear
How civilized to find a seat in front of a large gracious mirror, with everything you need for beauty close at hand. In combination with the Mica Shell wallpaper the handsome walnut wood bench, upholstered in a woven brown raffia, has just enough shimmer to make the setting sizzle. The brown glass vase holds spring tulips and a woven tray corrals grooming essentials.

Photography by Simon Burn

TWO:

Turkish Delight
Global influences abound with this ornate mother of pearl Turkish style mirror and leather clad British colonial style chair. The bronze Hindu hand keeps long necklaces tangle free and adds a sculptural element to the practical setting.

Design Tip: Found objects, such as the Hindu hand sculpture, are an ideal display for jewellery.

Photography by Simon Burn

Photography by Simon Burn

THREE:

Casual Dress Code
A comfy poof or ottoman, provided it’s the right height, makes an efficient perch for makeup application and the small magnifying mirror is a great assistant. The silver tray complements the chrome studding on the seat.