Cutout Map DIY

Map of Paris

Cut Out Map of Paris

MATERIALS REQUIRED
White paper
Tape
Self healing cutting mat
Exacto knife (and extra blades)
Metal ruler
Poster paper – black
Spray adhesive

GOOGLE MAPS
Find and print a map of your favourite city. Enlarge it on a photocopy machine to create a pleasing scale.

PAPER CUT
Place your map on top of a large white sheet of paper and tape together and then tape both pieces securely to cutting mat (so papers don’t shift). Using an Exacto knife and a metal ruler as a guide, carefully cut through both sheets of paper removing only the buildings and landmarks and leaving the streets uncut. The streets will remain intact, attached to the white paper.

CITY CENTER
Once all cuts are complete, remove the tape and carefully separate the photocopy from the white paper. Place the cutout underlay on top of a black or colourful piece of paper and affix in place with a spray adhesive.

INFRASTRUCTURE
Protect your art by framing it behind glass.

From Issue 17 – JulAug 2014

What’s Trending in the Art World

From mediums, to subject matter and hanging styles, here are just a few trends we’ve been noticing in the art world.

Photography
Photography continues to be prominently displayed on condo walls, in hotel lobbies and office spaces. Especially fashionable are large, colourful works that exude a sleek and contemporary feel, in line with a modern and cosmopolitan lifestyle. Scenes of urban decay, cinematic dreamscapes or landscapes are particularly trendy.

Maureen O'Connor, photograph

Photograph by Maureen O’Connor

 

New Media Art (Art + Technology)
The use of technology as subject matter and/or medium is omnipresent in the art world. Digital art, virtual art, internet art, multi-sensory and multi-media installations, even video games, have taken over the art world. Mixed media works that employ manipulated digital images combined with other mediums like paint, pencil or resin are also very fashionable.

David Trautrimas, digital photograph

Digital photograph by David Trautrimas

 

Resin
Resin is a trendy medium that many artists are adopting. Pouring resin onto panels or canvases gives the artwork a thick, glossy, modern surface. No matter if the work is a collage, photograph, digital work or painting, a resin coat provides a clean, contemporary and cool surface.

Aaron Jones, mixed media

Mixed media by Aaron Jones

 

Urban or Street Art
The aesthetics of street art are now widely celebrated in mainstream culture. Characteristically colourful, graphic, raw, energetic and immediate, graffiti and street art have moved from the sides of buildings in alleyways, on to canvases in private residences. Banksy is often credited with breaking down the walls between street art and high art.

Matthew Catalano, digital image

Digital Image by Matthew Catalano

 

Salon ­Style Hanging

Finally, a popular form of display, which actually has its roots in French salons of the 18th century, is the salon style display of hanging works of art. Filling a wall with an eclectic grouping, by arranging pieces together, no matter their colour, size, theme or media, breaks the monotony and adds interest to any space.

Retro Revitalized

  • Andy Warhol’s “Diamond Dust Shoes” takes pride of place above the slab marble fireplace.
  • Thanks to the broad, sweeping lines contemporary designers crave, this1970s home is a worthy candidate for stylish revitalization.
  • The horizontal mirror reflects the opposite side of the family room and the large hanging orbs used for ambient lighting. Aluminum floating beams with adjustable AR lamps act as spotlights for artwork.
  • “The key to working with an all-white scheme,” says Eric, “is to vary textures and finishes.” Here, sleek white lacquer cabinets are paired with a textured tumbled marble back splash made up of small mosaics. White leather barstools add another layer of interest and provide secondary seating within the generous kitchen.
  • The chrome banding on upper cabinets mimics the horizontal thrust of the island’s bar, made of honed Lagos Blue limestone.
  • A Brueton ‘Ginger’ dining table is surrounded by four white leather chairs and positioned within the sunny kitchen alcove.
  • Relocating a well-loved piece of art sparks new appreciation. Case in point, the playful chrome sculpture moved from home office to kitchen.

Large Scale Intimacy

Interior designer Eric McClelland of Fleur-de-Lis Design Inc. was eager to maintain the retro-modern edge of this urban Toronto home. With his client’s wishes for minimal colour firmly established, he set out to improve the functionality of the main rooms while respecting the home’s inherent architecture.

Ask anyone in a small condo if they’d like more space and the answer is likely a resounding ‘yes’. But extra large rooms have their own challenges.

“By dividing the long family room into two distinct seating areas,” says Eric, “we were able to create a more intimate scale for family gatherings and conversation.”

An extreme change of ceiling height (from 9 to 18 feet) provided another challenge, easily solved by strategically positioning nine hanging mirrored orbs to create a visual balance between the adjacent areas.

Using a simple palette of smoky taupe on the large upholstered pieces provides warmth and comfort without distracting from the room’s best commodity, an impressive art collection. Bright fuchsia toss cushions are a single nod to the client’s favourite colour.

Light Matters

To create more usable space, appliances were relocated within the renovated kitchen and desk space was allocated to an underutilized adjoining hallway. The Lagos Blue limestone anchors the setting by providing a warm contrast to the all-white kitchen.

“Previously, the lighting was comprised of giant pot lights, making a Swiss cheese effect on the ceiling.” says Eric. “To modernize the lighting plan, we introduced multiple MR 16 store fixtures and recessed pot lights into simple architectural coves.”

Dabble Savvy

  • Group AR bulbs in a series of three or four to create a single architectural fixture, avoiding a sea of pot lights.
  • Drop a ceiling when necessary to add cove lighting, which tucks up into ceilings.
  • Light sources with rotating heads offer flexibility, allowing you to put the focus on artwork or noteworthy collections.