What’s Trending: Grey & Yellow

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With fall in the air our nesting instinct kicks in. ‘Ward off the chill,’ says designer Christine DaCosta, ‘with the powerful pairing of yellow and grey.’

Featured Image: Jenna Bedding Collection, CA$35-$170, Urban Barn, www.urbanbarn.com

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 Vintage Yellow Glass Lamps, US$3900, Pieces, www.pieces.com

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 Tali Printed Shower Curtain, CA$40, West Elm, www.westelm.com

Read the entire article ‘What’s Trending – Grey&Yellow’ in Issue 10 of Dabble.

Eastern Exposure

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Eastern exposure provides the bright, yellow sunlight we all crave come February. Upbeat and exuberant eastern exposures are ideal for playrooms, kitchens and breakfast nooks.

Pros:
  • Sunlight elevates mood. Most people prefer sunshine pouring through windows.
  • Plentiful light works well for rooms full of activity. Kitchens, playrooms, living rooms.
Cons:
  • Strong sunlight can destroy delicate fabrics with silk being the most susceptible. Lining the draperies or a simple window treatment made from gauze, linen or sheer fabric will diffuse the strongest light and offer some protection to other textiles in the room.
  • Intense sunlight can cause glare and reflection issues. When we moved into our new condo we had just that problem. Surrounded by windows and high in the sky, we had intense sunlight pouring in. The previous owners mirrored the kitchen backsplash and you literally could not be in that room when the sun was most intense.
Colour Cue:
  • To enhance sunlight, warm, pale colours such as pink, coral, yellow or white.
  • To temper intense sunlight, cool, pale colours such as blue, green or white.
  • White works well in east facing rooms.

Paint Recommendations:
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The Forecast is Sunny

  • “I envisioned a bathroom that glistened like sparkling water with lemon, a refreshing spa feeling for guests.”
  • Even professional designers work with inspiration when decorating and, in this case, Lori says her inspiration was very specific.

Is yellow the new black?

Well, no. However, if you ask designer Lori Andrews, she might say, ‘It ought to be.’ What could possibly be sunnier or more inviting than this bright and cheery primary?

“Yellow is a current obsession,” says Lori, who is not only a professional interior designer but a photographer as well. Years in art school have made her fearless and there’s no colour that’s off limits. According to the Calgary native, she’s been adding more yellow into her designs during the past year, allowing the colour to grow brighter and bolder.

Lori positioned the saturated yellow against crisp white walls painted in Benjamin Moore’s Oxford White. Although the overall look would be quite different, Lori maintains a dark gray background would look equally stunning.

The advantage of a neutral background is that colour really pops. So many people are afraid of adding colour because they don’t know how to ‘pull it all together’.

Lori says, “Don’t even try. A colourful armoire or chair is like a handbag. It doesn’t need to match the rest of the outfit; it simply needs to complement it.”

The floors are finished with matte white octagon and dot porcelain tiles which warm the toes, thanks to electric floor heating. The white oak vanity by Roca and the light wishbone chair add natural warmth. The painted yellow door leads to the hallway and the sunny armoire provides storage for linens as well as a spot to hang freshly laundered clothes.

Lori advises her clients to be fearless when it comes to a room’s purpose. If you’re not a bath person, for example, don’t be afraid to remove an underutilized tub to gain a bigger shower.

Like most interior designers, Lori agrees it’s easier to design for clients than for herself. “I have strong convictions and have no difficulty convincing clients to go with bold colours or unusual materials,” says Lori. “Of course, in my own home I agonize over all the choices. Just like everyone else.”

Is there a colour Lori won’t work with? “No,” she says, “but I do feel sorry for terracotta. It’s going to have a heck of a hill to climb back up again.”