Chocolate Pistachio Coconut Cookies

Recipe courtesy Mallory Fay

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INGREDIENTS
2 + ¼ cup of all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
1 cup unsalted butter, room temperature
1 cup light brown sugar, tightly packed
1 box (3.4 ounce) pistachio pudding (not the sugar free version)
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 cup sweetened shredded coconut
1 cup chocolate chips
½ cup pistachios, shelled and roughly chopped

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INSTRUCTIONS

Preheat oven to 350F.

Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda and salt and set aside. In a large mixing bowl, cream together butter and brown sugar. Beat in pistachio pudding mix, eggs and vanilla. Mix until combined. With mixer on low, slowly add dry ingredients and mix until combined. Fold in coconut, chocolate chips and chopped pistachios. Drop tablespoon servings of dough onto prepared baking sheet and bake for 8-10 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool for about 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack.

Makes approximately 3 dozen cookies

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Colin and Justin’s Cabin Pressure Season Two

by Colin & Justin

Is it really a whole year since ‘Colin and Justin’s Cabin Pressure’, Season One, aired on the Cottage Life television network? Yup, 12 months have passed and, in that time, we’ve turned our attentions from Muskoka (location, for Season One) to Haliburton where we recently bought another slanty shanty – one that was almost falling down thanks to collapsed piers, major rot and serious animal infestation. But little fazes us: we, after all, can fix anything. Even if it means shedding desperate tears and dealing with construction issues that we’d rather leave to Bryan. Geddit? “Leave It To Bryan”? Oh never mind…

Colin and Justin - Cottage

Photography by Brandon Barre

But worry not: we turned adversity into joy. Our 800 feet collapsing marvel is positioned on beautiful Drag Lake, and, courtesy of its south west elevation – and good bones – it had potential written all over it. Let’s just say, though, that our reparative budget doubled… but so too did our final vision. In just four short months, we went from ‘pig in lipstick’ to beauty queen and we couldn’t be happier with the transformation. In exterior terms, it’s a veritable vision of Scandinavian minimalism: all graphite grey siding and jet-black roof. And inside? We composed a ‘luxe lodge’ esthetic with serious Mid Mod overtones. Don Draper eat your heart out. What better place than the cottage to imbibe an Old Fashioned cocktail?

As our transformative journey protracted, we added a whole new roof, an entire basement (did we mention we jacked the 30 ton house 20 feet off the ground? You have to see that scene to believe it) a new kitchen, two new bathrooms and two new bedrooms. And, while we were at it, we added a cute four bunk bedded bunkie and a whole new elevation to accommodate a sunroom. Jeesh…

Colin and Justin - Cottage Bath

Photography by Brandon Barre

It’s been a massive project but we couldn’t be happier. Last time round, we bought with friends, but this time round we invested alone. It’s so lovely. And we’re so happy. But, by God, the epic transformation nearly killed us. See all the Season 2 action weekly, from Sunday, 22nd March, at 9pm on Cottage Life. The network is in FREE preview from today, Saturday the 21st. Enjoy!

For more info visit www.cabinpressure.tv

Colin and Justin are appearing live at The Cottage Life Show on Saturday, March 28th at 1:00 pm.

New Home, Old Soul

  • Yanic's go to neutral: Benjamin Moore Classic Gray OC-23.
  • In this space, Yanic repurposed the metal art mirror above the sofa where it becomes a focal point. Benches create bridges between different zones within an open concept space. The black leather tufted bench is part of the conversation grouping and an extra seat near the fireplace.
  • Dabble Savvy: Turn a singular window seat into a destination with furniture and lighting. The walnut stools anchor the seating arrangement and the glass globe chandelier and plug-in sconces provide a flattering layer of light.

Words by Yanic Simard | Photography by Brandon Barré

Often, when homeowners move into a new space, whether freshly built or staged to sell, they’ll find the house simply doesn’t feel like a home.

Designer Yanic Simard shares his rules for claiming a new space and creating an interior that feels familiar and comfortable.

Treasured Heritage

Rather than replacing original details like mouldings and doors to achieve a more “perfect” look, allow these elements to become features using contrasting paint colours and finishes.

Dabble Savvy: In this Victorian house the walls, ceiling and trim are painted in one shade only, Benjamin Moore’s OC-23 Classic Gray. A single colour throughout visually obscures uneven lines and imperfections. A matte finish is used on walls and ceiling while the trim gets subtle emphasis with a satin finish. The doors are painted in Benjamin Moore’s 2121-10 Gray—a deeper shade that makes them pop for architectural interest.

In with the Old

To create a sense of personal history, introduce treasured items already owned.

Dabble Savvy: Blend vintage and contemporary pieces to blur time periods and create a custom, timeless impression.

Redraw the Lines

Never settle for a pre-existing layout—experiment with new furniture arrangements and always pull seating away from the walls.

Lighten Up

To add character without clutter include sheer and see-through elements like the draperies and peek-a-boo seating.

Dabble Savvy: Mirrored finishes and reflective metals (like the gold-leaf glass cocktail cubes in the living room) enrich almost any colour scheme without creating visual overload. Avoid a “matchy-matchy” look by casually mixing metals in warm and cool tones.

 

Sour Cream Pastry

Recipe by Sarah Sweeney
Photography by Shanghoon

Special Food Feature - Turkey and Chorizo Pot Pie

INGREDIENTS
1-¼ cups all purpose flour
1 tsp 
sugar
1 tsp 
salt
1 tbsp parsley, chopped
1 tsp thyme, chopped
1 tsp rosemary, chopped
½ cup 
cold butter
½ cup sour cream
1 tbsp water

DIRECTIONS
In a large bowl whisk together flour, sugar, salt and herbs. Grate the butter into the flour and toss to coat with flour. Using your hands rubs the mixture together to incorporate the butter into the flour.

In a small bowl, mix together the sour cream and water. Drizzle over the flour mixture. Blend with a fork until a rough dough is formed.

Flatten the dough into a disc. Wrap in plastic wrap and allow to chili for 30 minutes before rolling out.

Yields one 9″ pie

Make Sarah’s Chicken & Chorizo Pot Pie from Issue 21

More to See in Glasgow

Words by Alison Kent

17. University of Glasgow Tower. Credit University of Glasgow

Courtesy Glasgow City Marketing Bureau

Scotland’s biggest city, Glasgow is a unique blend of sophistication, vitality and rich culture. Boasting a thriving music and arts scene, trendy neighbourhoods, a wealth of green spaces, innovative cuisine, bike paths galore, and more single malt whisky selections than you can shake a ‘spurtle’ at (that’s a Scottish stick, or kitchen tool—used for flipping oatcakes on the griddle), there also exists an honest, down-to-earth friendliness that emanates from Glaswegians. So much so that the city has recently adopted ‘People Make Glasgow’ as its slogan.

Want to explore your family roots? Mitchell Library will help with ancestral history research. Like to party? Merchant City offers numerous watering holes, while Bath Street houses quirky basement bars and cocktail dens. Best neighbourhoods for shopping and dining? From boutiques to bars, the bohemian West End is the place to explore. Looking for a
legendary live music venue? King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut wears that crown.

Come along and learn more about this thriving (and independent in its own way) city.
CUISINE:

With eateries ranging from cafés to curry houses and posh pubs to fine dining, Glasgow may well be the finest place to dine in all of Scotland. Sample the upscale spin on the Scotch egg at The Gannet, savoury Highland crowdie at Ubiquitous Chip, and sticky toffee pudding with butterscotch sauce at Two Fat Ladies.

During the day, grab a cappuccino and slice of cake at The Tinder Box, then cross the street to George Mewes Cheese for an incredible selection of local and European cheeses, along with chutneys, oatcakes, honey and freshly baked artisan German breads to nosh on later, say…as part of an impromptu picnic.

FASHION:

Glasgow is a shopper’s paradise, with the second largest number of retail offerings in the U.K. Check out the ‘Style Mile’ around Buchanan Street, Argyle Street and Merchant City.

Retro shops abound throughout Glasgow, with top selections including Vintage Guru in the hipster West End of the city for designer duds and choice clothing options for men and women. Over at Kings Court, Mr Ben is cute and colourful, with an expansive and ever-changing selection of clothes and accessories, and with brands ranging from Fred Perry to more glam picks.

West end

Courtesy Glasgow City Marketing Bureau

ROAD TRIP:

Get thee, as the old Scottish song goes, to “the bonnie bonnie banks of Loch Lomond”. Less than an hour’s drive from Glasgow is the world-renowned banks of Loch Lomond, boasting a wealth of activities to partake in and attractions to see. Shop for antiques, woollens and designer brand names at Loch Lomond Shore overlooking the loch, stroll along pathways bordering the lake, and take a sunset champagne cruise aboard the Celtic Warrior.

Closer still, historic Stirling is home to the newly refurbished and interactive Bannockburn Heritage Centre – this year, marking 700 years since King Robert the Bruce took on the English army against all odds to win the freedom that shaped Scotland. Another must-see is Stirling Castle, built in the 16th Century – take a walk through the nearby Old Town Cemetery. There, on ‘Ladies’ Rock’, women of the court would have the best vantage point from which to admire their jousting knights’ talents during tournaments.

There’s more to see and do in Glasgow in Issue 19.

Lemon, Butter and Sugar Crêpes

Recipe by Chef Cat Cora.

Cat_Cora_Crepes

For Crêpes (makes 10 – 12)

INGREDIENTS:
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 large egg, beaten
1 cup milk
3 tbsp unsalted butter, melted for brushing crêpe pan or skillet

DIRECTIONS:
Preheat the oven to 250 F.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, egg and milk until smooth. Place a 6-inch nonstick crêpe pan, a heavy skillet, or a griddle over medium-high heat. (A nonstick pan is easiest.) Brush the pan lightly with the butter and wipe out any excess with a paper towel.

Pour in just enough batter (less than ¼ cup) to cover the bottom of the pan. Holding the pan by the handle, tilt it so the bat ter runs across the bottom and covers the entire base of the pan. After about 1 minute, the crêpe w ill turn golden brown and the edges will crisp and pull away from the pan. Then, turn the crêpe over and cook for 30 seconds, until the second side is lightly browned. Remove the crêpe from the pan and place on an ovenproof plate to cool. As the crêpes cool, you can form a stack and keep them warm in the oven. Repeat with the remaining melted butter and batter.

Serve immediately, or store in the freezer by placing sheets of wax paper or plastic wrap between crêpes, then wrap the entire batch in plastic wrap.

Finishing Touches

INGREDIENTS:
10-12 crêpes
2 tbsp unsalted butter
5-6 fresh lemons, cut in half
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar (optional)
20 strawberries, sliced (optional)

DIRECTIONS:
Reheat the crêpes one at a time in a large nonstick skillet. When the crêpe is hot, put ½ teaspoon of butter on a knife and gently rub over the surface.

Squeeze juice from half a lemon over the crêpe, sprinkle 1 teaspoon of sugar sparingly over the juice, then fold the crêpe in half, and in half again to form a quarter circle.

If you like, dust a little confectioners’ sugar on the top and garnish with a few fresh strawberry slices.

Serves 4-6
For more recipes by Chef Cat Cora, check out her book – Cooking from the Hip.

A Taste of Chocolate Pie

Torta Havannet - South America

Torta Havannet – Dulce de Leche Chocolate Pie

South America

Pastry, dulce de leche and chocolate? What’s not to love about this rich and gooey South American pie? Make it a day ahead and chill overnight in the refrigerator for best results.

INGREDIENTS:
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/8 tsp salt
1 stick (4oz) butter, cut into small cubes and chilled
1 large egg, lightly beaten
2 1/4 cups (18 fl oz) dulce de leche (Manjar brand)
6 oz bittersweet chocolate, roughly chopped
1/4 cup (2 fl oz) heavy cream

INSTRUCTIONS:
In a food processor, combine flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda, salt and butter. Pulse until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Add lightly beaten egg and pulse until mixture forms a ball. Gently form dough into a disc, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least an hour.

Preheat oven to 350˚F and grease a 10″ pie or cake tin. Roll dough out to 12″ circle and press into prepared tin. Place a circle of parchment paper and a cup of dried beans or rice on top of pie shell. Bake for 10 minutes. Remove beans/rice and parchment and bake for a further 5 minutes. Set aside to cool. When pie shell is cool, fill with dulce de leche. Warm cream in a small, heavy bottomed pan until almost boiling. Remove from heat and stir in chocolate until melted. Pour chocolate mixture over dulce de leche and spread evenly.

Refrigerate until chocolate is hardened, preferably overnight, then unmold and cut into thin slices with a sharp knife.

Serves 8

Israel – A History Lesson

Words by Shai DeLuca-Tamasi

Church of the Holy Sepulchre - Noam Chen

Church of the Holy Sepulchre – Photography by Noam Chen

Jerusalem used to be the centre of the world. An ancient New York City, Paris or Milan if you will. At one time religion trumped everything and Jerusalem was a mecca. People travelled to Israel for religious pilgrimage, but also for business, trade and the arts. Though at the time called Judea, Israel was part of the Roman Empire. As the years progressed it was captured by various empires. Each conquering civilization contributed its own style, design and fashion sense to the collective fabric of Israel.

Jump forward to 1948, post World War II; immigration to Israel was at an all time high, flowing in from all over Europe, North Africa and the Americas. With each swell of immigration, new design and style arrived in Israel.

2682_Rabin square_Tel Aviv

Rabin square, Tel Aviv – Photography by Dana Friedlander

Today, Israel has evolved and developed in ways that are often described as remarkable. Israel has its own unique design sense—a compilation of our rich history.

In October 2013 I travelled to Israel with my friend (and Cityline co-celeb) Kimberley Seldon. I was able to share the richness of Israel with Kimberley and the Cityline viewers. It’s a trip I won’t soon forget.

jerusalem101

Kimberley Seldon and Shai DeLuca-Tamasi film for www.cityline.ca

Though having spent my formative years in Israel, as well as serving for three years in the IDF, the experience of seeing the country through a camera lens was a life changing experience for me. It was a blessing being able to bring back footage for our Cityline viewers and Dabble readers.

I was fortunate to see how the design scene has surpassed even my high expectations. Needless to say, I couldn’t even bring back everything I purchased. Thank goodness for international shipping! I hope that all of our readers have the opportunity to visit Israel, but in the interim, I wanted to share some of my favourite Israeli products and design with you. Though I could fill the next year of issues with the amazing items, I’ve chosen my five favourite!

IMG_00000065

Shop Israel with Shai in the May 2014 issue

Baked Eggs with Bacon

Recipe by Chef Marc Matsumoto

Baked Eggs

INGREDIENTS:
2 slices thick cut bacon
1 shallot, minced
2 tbsp parsley, chopped
5 ramps, bulbs minced, leaves chopped
1 1/2 cups stewed tomatoes, chopped
salt and pepper
honey (optional)
2-3 eggs
ricotta insalata

OPTIONAL:
parsley
basil
chives
scallions
ramp leaves

DIRECTIONS:
Preheat broiler. Move oven rack to the top position.

For tomato sauce, place bacon on oven-safe pan and fry over medium heat until some oil renders out. Add minced shallots and ramp bulbs, sauté until soft and fragrant. Add chopped parsley and ramp leaves; cook until they are just wilted. Add tomatoes, then salt and pepper to taste. If sauce is too tart, add honey to sweeten slightly.

Use a spoon to make 2-3 wells in the tomato sauce and drop an egg into each well. Crumble cheese on top and bring the sauce to a boil. When the bottoms of the eggs start to turn white, transfer the pan to the oven. Broil directly under the heating element for about 1 minute, or until the cheese is browned and the eggs have turned white on top.

Quickly garnish baked eggs with parsley, basil, chives, scallions, or ramp leaves. Serve on toasted bread.

Serves 2-3

A Taste of Café de Olla

Mexico

Mexican Coffee
Warm, sweet and spicy, a steaming cup of Café de Olla is a perfect kick start to your day. Traditionally prepared in a clay pot (the Olla), I prefer to serve this spiced coffee in a big cappuccino bowl. Café de Olla (cah-FAY day OY-ah) is sweetened with little cones of rich, dark unrefined sugar called piloncillo which give a delicious burnt-sugar taste to the coffee, and are easily found in Mexican grocers or online at www.mexgrocer.com.

INGREDIENTS:
4 cups water
1/2 cup grated piloncillo (or dark brown sugar)
4 cinnamon sticks
2/3 cup coarse ground dark roast coffee
3 cloves
1/4 tsp anise seed (optional)

Special Equipment:
Fine sieve
Cheesecloth or French press for filtering

INSTRUCTIONS:
Place water, sugar, cinnamon and cloves in heavy bottomed pan. Stir over a medium high heat until sugar is dissolved, and bring to a boil.

Stir in coffee and remove from heat. Allow to steep for about 5 minutes.

Strain through fine sieve or cheesecloth or pour into French press and push plunger down to filter. Pour into mugs and serve. Sprinkle with anise seed if desired.

Note: This is quite a sweet coffee, so reduce the amount of sugar if you usually drink your coffee unsweetened.

Serve with: Churros or pan dulce (Mexican sweet rolls).

Salmon Stuffed Baked Potato and Apple Cider Peas

Recipe by Chef Kerry Sear

BLD_KerrySear - Dinner

INGREDIENTS:
4 4oz fillets of salmon (skin off )
4 Russet potatoes
4 tbsp butter
1/2 cup apple cider
2 cups peas
salt and pepper

DIRECTIONS:
Preheat oven to 350°F.

Wrap Russet potatoes in foil and place in oven for approximately 40 minutes or until done.

Season salmon fillets with salt and pepper. In a medium sauté pan, sear salmon on both sides.

With a knife, partially cut the cooked Russet potato down the middle, lengthwise. Scoop out a little of the potato inside. Place the salmon fillet inside the potato and cover the salmon with the potato that was scooped out. Pat with 1 tablespoon of butter on each potato. Reform the potato into shape. Place potato in oven for approximately 15 minutes or until salmon is cooked to desired temperature.

Heat the apple cider in a small saucepan. Add peas. Cook until peas are done. Season with salt and pepper.

To serve, take the potato out of the oven, cut in half to show salmon and serve with peas.

Serves 4

Escovitch Dressing

Recipe courtesy Cook Like a Jamaican

Escovitch

Originally appeared in Issue 4

 

INGREDIENTS
½ each green and red bell pepper, julienned
1 medium carrot, julienned
1 small onion, sliced in rings
3 tbsp cooking oil (use leftover oil used to fry fish)
⅔ cup vinegar
10 pimento seeds (optional)
½ tsp salt
1 tsp pepper sauce
½ scotch bonnet pepper, seed removed
and chopped

DIRECTIONS
Cut vegetables and put aside.

Put vinegar and oil into a saucepan and bring to a boil. Add carrots and pimento seeds and let simmer for about 1 minute. Add salt, pepper sauce and bell peppers and simmer for 1 minute.

Add onion and simmer for about 3 minutes or until the onion is transparent. Add scotch bonnet pepper and stir.

Place fish into serving dish and spoon dressing on top.

Serves 4