New Home, Old Soul

  • Yanic's go to neutral: Benjamin Moore Classic Gray OC-23.
  • In this space, Yanic repurposed the metal art mirror above the sofa where it becomes a focal point. Benches create bridges between different zones within an open concept space. The black leather tufted bench is part of the conversation grouping and an extra seat near the fireplace.
  • Dabble Savvy: Turn a singular window seat into a destination with furniture and lighting. The walnut stools anchor the seating arrangement and the glass globe chandelier and plug-in sconces provide a flattering layer of light.

Words by Yanic Simard | Photography by Brandon Barré

Often, when homeowners move into a new space, whether freshly built or staged to sell, they’ll find the house simply doesn’t feel like a home.

Designer Yanic Simard shares his rules for claiming a new space and creating an interior that feels familiar and comfortable.

Treasured Heritage

Rather than replacing original details like mouldings and doors to achieve a more “perfect” look, allow these elements to become features using contrasting paint colours and finishes.

Dabble Savvy: In this Victorian house the walls, ceiling and trim are painted in one shade only, Benjamin Moore’s OC-23 Classic Gray. A single colour throughout visually obscures uneven lines and imperfections. A matte finish is used on walls and ceiling while the trim gets subtle emphasis with a satin finish. The doors are painted in Benjamin Moore’s 2121-10 Gray—a deeper shade that makes them pop for architectural interest.

In with the Old

To create a sense of personal history, introduce treasured items already owned.

Dabble Savvy: Blend vintage and contemporary pieces to blur time periods and create a custom, timeless impression.

Redraw the Lines

Never settle for a pre-existing layout—experiment with new furniture arrangements and always pull seating away from the walls.

Lighten Up

To add character without clutter include sheer and see-through elements like the draperies and peek-a-boo seating.

Dabble Savvy: Mirrored finishes and reflective metals (like the gold-leaf glass cocktail cubes in the living room) enrich almost any colour scheme without creating visual overload. Avoid a “matchy-matchy” look by casually mixing metals in warm and cool tones.

 

What’s Trending: Blue

What's Trending - Blue Main

Interior Design by Christine DaCosta – Photography by Stephani Buchman 

Don’t be afraid to use colour in your home. Think of blue as a neutral!
Custom sofa by Decor by Christine

For more blue inspiration, check out the new issue on May 29, 2014.

La Nouvelle Orleans

  • Celedon is a refreshing complement to the more neutral French grey and buff colours in this cozy family room.
  • The formal living room is filled with fine antiques Terri has sourced during her many trips to Europe.
  • LEFT: A velvet sofa rests handsomely beneath a hand-painted wooden screen.
  • Silk drapes puddle decadently onto gleaming parquet floors.
  • Antique dealer Terri Goldsmith arranges a bounty of hydrangeas and lilies in her elegant foyer.
  • The garden and pool mirror the formality of the home.
  • Manicured walkways are outlined with neatly clipped box wood hedges.

Sweeping down the intricate wrought iron staircase, surrounded by luxe floor mosaics and crystal chandeliers, who wouldn’t feel like a French empress? Terri Goldsmith gives Dabble a royal welcome, New Orleans style.

Unlike the proverbial shoe maker’s child, antique dealer Terri Goldsmith enjoys living in a well-appointed home. One that shows off her masterful skill in decorating with fine furnishings, attention to detail and savoir faire.

Photography by Cherie-Lynn Buchanan

I’m Coming Home

  • “The majority of furnishings were custom designed and manufactured for this project. We wanted to feature and honour our clients’ existing art and sculpture collection.”
  • The foyer and living room walls are painted Benjamin Moore Swiss Coffee OC-60.
  • The fresh and neutral fabrics and finishes create a classic palette that stands the test of time, allowing the Gregory Hardy painting above the custom sofa to stand forward visually from the room’s other elements.
  • One of the most dramatic changes to the home’s layout occurred when the kitchen was opened to the family room. The structural change required the addition of a supporting beam hidden in the ceiling, circumventing any visible bulkhead and allowing the rooms to flow from one space to the other without visual interruption.
  • Adjacent to the newly renovated kitchen is the open concept family room. This is a favourite spot for the family to linger after a busy day.
  • The handsome vignette with the stepped mirror and a custom wood chest is a nod to the drama and beauty of art deco styling.
  • A bright and sunny breakfast area with 15’ cathedral ceiling and banquette seating completes the kitchen area. The team selected a banquette to allow for wider pathways and a stunning sight line from the kitchen. Kitchen cabinetry lines the walkway and provides extra storage and the visual flow the family required.
  • Practical finishes were mandatory in the all-white kitchen, which features satin sheen lacquered cabinetry, stone countertops and stained walnut for the island.

A large family demands a big makeover. Fortunately, Tomas Pearce Interior Design Consulting has the talent and muscle to satisfy such a tall order. When the CEO of one of Toronto’s largest and leading luxury condominium developers approached cofounders Tania Richardson and Melandro Quillatan, he was looking for an update as well as a strategy for developing a home that supports the needs of his wife and three teens.

The first floor of this century-old, 3,500 square foot home in Lawrence Park, Toronto is much improved these days owing to its recent renovation which resulted in an improved aesthetic and functionality. The initial lack of architectural interest and weak flow was transformed, resulting in what is now a more current and transitional design.

“Select a neutral palette to provide longevity. Decorative lighting, art and accessories arethe elegant finishing touches.”

Original floors were replaced with wide hardwood planks throughout the main level. In the 375 square foot living room, Tomas Pearce Interior Design Consulting created several conversation areas, with key furnishings linking them together for larger events.

The living room’s soft colours are reflected in the mirrored coffee table from Cocoon Furnishings in Oakville. The large patterned area carpet from Elte Carpet and Home provides a geometric anchor to the light coloured furnishings. Layers of lighting—potlights, sconces and table lampsare sourced from suppliers Sescolite, Casalife and Royal Lighting.

The addition of the banquette within the bay window amplifies usable space and provides additional seating, which comes in handy when entertaining.

When choosing furniture and accessories, select hues and undertones that pair well, creating cohesive flow throughout the home.

“To ensure consistency from room to room,” says Melandro, “use a single wall colour, place furniture strategically to achieve comfortable flow, keep wall paneling and any trim consistent.”

This century-old home has never looked better thanks to its much-needed update.

Photography by Larry Arnal

Southern Belle

  • Designer, Lucinda Robinson, stands in the doorway of the 50s bungalow she decorated for downtown clients in Charleston. In addition to interior design, Lucinda is an established clothing designer. She models a dress from her popular Lucinda Eden shop, located on King St. in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • Green subway tiles on the double-sided fireplace are original to the home, providing colour inspiration throughout. The wool and sisal carpet from GDC home embraces the living room seating and offers the homeowners the comfort they desired.
  • In the dining room, the upholstered chairs from Vanguard Furniture are covered in white, washable suede. The reliable fabric holds up to heavy use, ideally suiting the homeowners’ lifestyle as they are frequent entertainers. Lucinda’s personal favourite in the room is the custom trestle table made by an artisan in North Car olina. A reproduction chandelier from Currey and Co. complements the dark wood tones in the dining table, sideboard and floor.
  • Though the welcoming foyer is mostly neutral, its colour scheme is brightened with the apple coloured lamp from GDC Home which sits on an antique table—a family heirloom.

It’s a southern revival for this 2,000 square foot, 3 bedroom Arts and Crafts bungalow in downtown Charleston thanks to designer Lucinda Robinson.

Having designed the client’s previous homesa traditional single house and a country estateLucinda easily transitioned Kristy Anderson and family to the smaller bungalow without sacrificing function or style.

Since the south is all about hospitality, the home is family-friendly and ready to receive guests at any time. If you are in the market for some beautiful furniture I suggest checking out Wellington’s Leather Furniture.

Luxe Desert Retreat

  • Jamie used a grasscloth wallpaper in the foyer and hall to create textural interest without distracting from the beauty of the moulding.
  • “Reflective quality doesn’t always have to be glass, marble or other hard surfaces. Shine also comes from fabrics like the silk velvet material on the sofa cushions.” ~ Jamie
  • A classic white kitchen with framed cabinetry and white Calcutta marble countertops complements the home’s traditional elements. A custom marble mosaic on the back of the island acts as powerful art in a neutral colour scheme.
  • In the master bedroom, Jamie demonstrates that it is completely acceptable to put a bed in front of a window.
  • “I reoriented the floor plan and put the bed in front of the window deliberately to make the bed front and center in the room.”

You wouldn’t know it from its formal interior, but this 7000 square foot home is located in Paradise Valley, Arizona, amidst the deserts and the cacti. Designer Jamie Herzlinger is up to the challenge of transforming the house from top to bottom with her client’s specific vision in mind: luxe desert retreat.

When you enter the home you are instantly greeted by the 19th century Dutch corbeille-shaped canapé which sits on top of Marie Antoinette patterned hardwood floors: the entrance showstopper.

Jamie designed a niche in the foyer to give the room a large presence. The mirror, that sits above the Marquetry commode, purposely reflects into the dining room.

Jamie describes this space as refined elegance because it’s not too formal but formal enough to go from jeans to black tie.

Jamie says the key to achieving a similar look is to always keep it simple. A neutral palette should have different variations of white and flexible lighting, including table lamps and a chandelier like the Sophia Chandelier by Jan Showers. Desert life never looked so luxe.

Photography by Werner Segarra.

The Forecast is Sunny

  • “I envisioned a bathroom that glistened like sparkling water with lemon, a refreshing spa feeling for guests.”
  • Even professional designers work with inspiration when decorating and, in this case, Lori says her inspiration was very specific.

Is yellow the new black?

Well, no. However, if you ask designer Lori Andrews, she might say, ‘It ought to be.’ What could possibly be sunnier or more inviting than this bright and cheery primary?

“Yellow is a current obsession,” says Lori, who is not only a professional interior designer but a photographer as well. Years in art school have made her fearless and there’s no colour that’s off limits. According to the Calgary native, she’s been adding more yellow into her designs during the past year, allowing the colour to grow brighter and bolder.

Lori positioned the saturated yellow against crisp white walls painted in Benjamin Moore’s Oxford White. Although the overall look would be quite different, Lori maintains a dark gray background would look equally stunning.

The advantage of a neutral background is that colour really pops. So many people are afraid of adding colour because they don’t know how to ‘pull it all together’.

Lori says, “Don’t even try. A colourful armoire or chair is like a handbag. It doesn’t need to match the rest of the outfit; it simply needs to complement it.”

The floors are finished with matte white octagon and dot porcelain tiles which warm the toes, thanks to electric floor heating. The white oak vanity by Roca and the light wishbone chair add natural warmth. The painted yellow door leads to the hallway and the sunny armoire provides storage for linens as well as a spot to hang freshly laundered clothes.

Lori advises her clients to be fearless when it comes to a room’s purpose. If you’re not a bath person, for example, don’t be afraid to remove an underutilized tub to gain a bigger shower.

Like most interior designers, Lori agrees it’s easier to design for clients than for herself. “I have strong convictions and have no difficulty convincing clients to go with bold colours or unusual materials,” says Lori. “Of course, in my own home I agonize over all the choices. Just like everyone else.”

Is there a colour Lori won’t work with? “No,” she says, “but I do feel sorry for terracotta. It’s going to have a heck of a hill to climb back up again.”