Design Unleashed

  • Designer Kimberley Seldon placed an enormous ancient mill stone from Italy dead centre and aligned it with the front door, immediately creating a sense of order in the space.
  • Custom arm chairs flank a metal drum which acts as a coffee table, providing a perfect perch for quiet contemplation.
  • It's not uncommon to find large columns poorly placed in new condos but again, it makes decorating a wee bit more challenging. To give the column a sense of purpose Kimberley placed a tall wooden Buddha in front of the structural feature.
  • The comfy grey sectional (Jamie Alexander) surrounds a round wood coffee table from West Elm. Colourful salmon and navy pillows from ELTE fill the space with colour.
  • Behind the sectional, a low Asian bench tucks beneath a sofa table.
  • Sculptural pieces like the Buddha and bronze leaf offer big style statements.

Interior Design by Kimberley Seldon Design Group
Photography by Ted Yarwood

Who doesn’t want to feel zen at home?

Easier said than done when you have challenging spaces to decorate—like the pie-shaped entry hall that greets you as you enter the front door of this urban condo.

The cool couple who live here had lots of ideas when it came to decorating. They wanted to display some of the treasures they’ve collected on their extensive travels for instance. But when it came to the sitting area…they were stumped. How to deal with a severely pie-shaped space?

French Castle

  • By 1980 this medieval castle, dating to the 12th century, was in complete disrepair. Homeowners Alan and Laurence Geddes fell in love with the estate and restored it to its full beauty.
  • Located 60 km from Toulouse Chateau de Mayragues is surrounded by vineyards with vines cultivated for almost 400 years.
  • Laurence was awarded the Grand prix des Vieilles Maisons Françaises in 1998 thanks to her efforts restoring the historical site.
  • All hallways lead to more charm and history.
  • Most of the furniture was handed down to Laurence by her family who originated from Normandy.
  • The chaise longue was given to her by a childhood friend from Paris and now sits in her own bedroom.
  • Today, Alan and Laurence manage an organic and bio-dynamic vineyard and share the castle as a bed and breakfast.

Bonjour Paris

  • A carefree mix of flea market finds and contemporary furniture anchors the light filled living room which overlooks the terrace. Original ceilings, painted white, amplify available light and play up the newly installed Marie Antoinette floors in grey.
  • Large scale artworks and a blue velvet Boà Sofa designed by Fernando & Humberto Campana are dominant features in the room.
  • Fearless mixing—high gloss cabinetry (Boffi Cuisine) meets rustic flea market island—creates tension and dynamic interest in the functional kitchen. The gnarly stool is from Serendipity.
  • The vintage foosball table strikes a playful pose near the dining room, which is turned out in more flea market finds.
  • The black Jitz table sports a mass of white candles for evening meals.
  • Pulling the bed (Conran Shop) away from the wall offers up additional space for artwork. Dabble Savvy: Opt for a floor lamp beside the bed to free up space on the nightstand.
  • A tub as lovely as this one by Devon & Devon deserves to be the centre of attention. The marble font (most likely originally used in a church) serves as a stylish sink against one wall.

Interior Design by D.Mesure
Photography by Stefan clement

An address along the fashionable Saint Germain des Près? Swoon worthy.

Sadly, years of neglect took their toll on this gracious (5,000 square feet) Parisian apartment. Enter designer Elodie Sire from d.mesure and voilà—a French beauty is revived.

Havana Haven

  • Dago and Laura love to entertain. The living room is a welcoming space where they receive friends.
  • Get the Look: The Late Sofa designed by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec was purchased at Vitra in Madrid and the Shell Chair is by Hans J. Wegner. The two photographs are by Cuban photographer Felipe Dulzaides and the coffee table and floor lamp are from an antique store in Havana.
  • Dago and Laura's son loves to play in the family room which also doubles as a yoga and pilates studio for mom. The blue wheelbarrow is a Los Carpinteros piece and the orange Dar Chairs are by Charles and Ray Eames. The art above the sofa is by Cuban artist Alejandro Cam.
  • Adjacent to the living room is the office and library with a collection that includes art, architecture and design books as well as catalogues from Los Carpinteros' expositions .
  • When the couple renovated, the kitchen grew to accommodate open shelving. Dago made the kitchen table out of his grandmother's old sewing machine.
  • The dining room gets its punch from the orange covered vintage chairs which look out onto a lush back garden and fountain. The vintage dining room table and chairs are from a local antique shop. The oil painting is by Cuban artist Carlos Quintana .

Photography by Carlos Ernesto Escalona Marti (Kako)

Renowned Cuban artist Dago Rodríguez (aka one half of the Los Carpinteros duo) creates art for a variety of patrons all over the world. The Vedado, Havana home he shares with his wife, kite boarding instructor Laura Lis, is as artfully styled and cool as hell.

New Home, Old Soul

  • Yanic's go to neutral: Benjamin Moore Classic Gray OC-23.
  • In this space, Yanic repurposed the metal art mirror above the sofa where it becomes a focal point. Benches create bridges between different zones within an open concept space. The black leather tufted bench is part of the conversation grouping and an extra seat near the fireplace.
  • Dabble Savvy: Turn a singular window seat into a destination with furniture and lighting. The walnut stools anchor the seating arrangement and the glass globe chandelier and plug-in sconces provide a flattering layer of light.

Words by Yanic Simard | Photography by Brandon Barré

Often, when homeowners move into a new space, whether freshly built or staged to sell, they’ll find the house simply doesn’t feel like a home.

Designer Yanic Simard shares his rules for claiming a new space and creating an interior that feels familiar and comfortable.

Treasured Heritage

Rather than replacing original details like mouldings and doors to achieve a more “perfect” look, allow these elements to become features using contrasting paint colours and finishes.

Dabble Savvy: In this Victorian house the walls, ceiling and trim are painted in one shade only, Benjamin Moore’s OC-23 Classic Gray. A single colour throughout visually obscures uneven lines and imperfections. A matte finish is used on walls and ceiling while the trim gets subtle emphasis with a satin finish. The doors are painted in Benjamin Moore’s 2121-10 Gray—a deeper shade that makes them pop for architectural interest.

In with the Old

To create a sense of personal history, introduce treasured items already owned.

Dabble Savvy: Blend vintage and contemporary pieces to blur time periods and create a custom, timeless impression.

Redraw the Lines

Never settle for a pre-existing layout—experiment with new furniture arrangements and always pull seating away from the walls.

Lighten Up

To add character without clutter include sheer and see-through elements like the draperies and peek-a-boo seating.

Dabble Savvy: Mirrored finishes and reflective metals (like the gold-leaf glass cocktail cubes in the living room) enrich almost any colour scheme without creating visual overload. Avoid a “matchy-matchy” look by casually mixing metals in warm and cool tones.

 

Calgary Living

  • The sofas with fabric from Kravet are custom through Elle Design. The stone top coffee tables are from Ethan Allen. Wall colour, Pittsburgh Paints Ostrich Feather.
  • Dining Chairs custom through Elle Design, fabrics by JF fabrics and Kravet. Dining Table and Sideboard custom through Modern Country Interiors. Lighting custom Zia Priven light through Stonegate Designs. Mirror Chintz & Co.
  • "Not everything has to be the star in a room. Some finishes and elements are supporting players. Pick your focus." ~ Leanne

“There’s no greater compliment to a designer than being asked to do a second (or third) project for a client,” says LeAnne Bunnell of Elle Design in Calgary.

When repeat customers hired interior designer LeAnne Bunnell to transform an intended bachelor pad into a comfortable family home they knew they were in great hands. After all, they’d worked with LeAnne before and were confident she had the skill to bring their design and lifestyle visions to life.

Were they pleased? They’re already working on their next project together.

LIVING
The living room is open to the kitchen and provides access to the backyard. LeAnne resisted any temptation to make this room “formal” as the family wanted a cozy space for casual entertaining.

DINING
The beadboard ceiling and textured grass cloth walls emphasize the more traditional elements of the design while providing a comfortable atmosphere for adult or family entertaining. The fabrics are all washable.

“Dining rooms should be used frequently. Obviously for eating, but also for making family memories.”

Photography by Adrian Shellard

Modern History

  • Sunlight fills the entry, throwing light onto stone walls likely more than 400 years old.
  • A series of glass paneled doors greets the entry and closes to offer privacy (when combined with blackout shades) in the master bedroom.
  • The building’s shell is composed of a combination of pottery and beach sand. The bisque and terracotta colours create natural warmth in the coved dining room.
  • The architects created distinct viewpoints in each of the rooms, often providing a glimpse into adjacent spaces. The organic shaped coffee tables and rustic woven rug support a mandate to use natural, raw materials.
  • The Mediterranean Sea is reflected in a mirror that brings light into the spare living space. The cable strung staircase rises gracefully to the master bedroom above.
  • The galley kitchen efficiently carves utilitarian space into the home and provides those in residence with an expansive view of the Mediterranean Sea.
  • Sleeping quarters are stacked above the living room, where they enjoy full ocean views.

Set above the harbor, facing the majestic Mediterranean Sea in Old Jaffa, is an ancient structure given new life by the thoughtful architects hired to restore its integrity.

Though it’s difficult to determine the structure’s exact age, it is clear that it is hundreds of years old. Over time, changes and additions had damaged the original integrity of the dwelling. The central ideal, therefore, was to restore the original characteristics—the stone walls, the segmented ceilings and the arches—to peel back and expose the original state.

The language of minimalism embedded in a historic residence in Old Jaffa.

“Surprisingly modern, minimalistic construction styles (especially ancient ones) allow us to create new spaces that blend periods together—even intensify them because of the contrast and tension between the ages.” ~ Pitsou

The historical is expressed by preserving the textures and materials of the building’s outer shell and by respecting the engineering accordingly.

The modern is expressed by opening spaces and altering the internal flow, and by incorporating natural materials such as stainless steel, iron and wood.

Pistou’s project succeeds in both honoring and preserving the historical and romantic values of the structure while creating a contemporary project suited to today’s lifestyle.

Designed by Pitsou Kedem, Raz Melamed & Irene Goldberg

Photography by Amit Geron

Spring Forward

  • Panelled walls and cofferred ceiling, were designed and installed to satisfy the clients’ craving for architecture more commonplace in stately east coast homes. The sunburst mirror is a “placeholder” to enjoy until a large scale piece of artwork is purchased.
  • Art: Oil painting by artist Michelle Armas provides a counterbalance to the geometric prints on the furniture and pillows.
  • Kitchen: The all-white kitchen gets its drama from dark stained 5” wide rift cut white oak floors, with a Rubio Monocoat oil finish. The table and Navy chairs are Restoration Hardware.
  • Dining Room: White panelled wainscotting is handsomely paired with a Phillip Jeffries grass cloth (Manila Hemp Graphite 3444). The head chairs, backed in raspberry, create a flow of colour from room to room.
  • Children's Bedroom: Fiorella likes to take her colour cues from the clients—pink and green are obviously a favourite combination for the girls (age 4 and 6) in residence.
  • Family Room: “We rotated the kitchen and removed walls so all the rooms face the back yard and pool area.”

When clients moved from Connecticut to sunny Menlo Park, it didn’t take them long to shed those extra layers required for warmth back home and embrace their new lighter California lifestyle.

The designer created a blend of east coast-west coast that would respect her client’s love for architecture with a pedigree and inject a more playful west coast palette.

The result? Springtime, year round.

Photography by Frank Paul Perez

GoldenEye

  • Furnishings, like the bamboo and wicker drumtables and stone coffee table are simple and organic in shape. Classic Panton chairs tuck under the dark wood chess tables.
  • Black frames on a white bead board wall display images of Bond author, Ian Fleming at GoldenEye.
  • The unassuming white-washed bungalow with cedar shingles is perched atop an oceanfront cliff that leads to a private beach.
  • Sustainable wood furniture connects the interior to nature.
  • The textured ceiling gives the whitewashed interior a more intimate scale.
  • As the author said himself, “Don’t on any account fool around too much with colours. Keep everything white inside.”
  • Fleming's original desk (the one at which he wrote 14 James Bond novels) still resides at GoldenEye.
  • The villa also features a private outdoor spa bathroom surrounded by tropical foliage, blooming trees and bamboo fences.

 PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANGELA AUCLAIR

Design for Living

  • Sir Noël Coward, the legendary English playwright, actor, singer, director and composer was also known for his flamboyant wit and personal style.
  • Immortalized in this stone statue, Coward sits forever in his beloved garden, peering out onto an almost unchanged glorious natural coastline.
  • Inside, rooms are filled with Coward’s original furniture, artifacts, paintings and photographs.
  • A photo of good friend, Marlene Dietrich sits atop the piano.

East of Oracabessa, Jamaica sits Firefly, named after the glowing insects indigenous to these lush hills. Noël Coward’s famed mountaintop estate offers an unparallelled view of St Mary’s harbor, the original lookout for the notorious pirate Sir Henry Morgan (of rum bottle fame).

My sense of importance to small. On the other hand importance to myself to the world is relatively hand my sense of my own myself is tremendous.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANGELA AUCLAIR

I’m Coming Home

  • “The majority of furnishings were custom designed and manufactured for this project. We wanted to feature and honour our clients’ existing art and sculpture collection.”
  • The foyer and living room walls are painted Benjamin Moore Swiss Coffee OC-60.
  • The fresh and neutral fabrics and finishes create a classic palette that stands the test of time, allowing the Gregory Hardy painting above the custom sofa to stand forward visually from the room’s other elements.
  • One of the most dramatic changes to the home’s layout occurred when the kitchen was opened to the family room. The structural change required the addition of a supporting beam hidden in the ceiling, circumventing any visible bulkhead and allowing the rooms to flow from one space to the other without visual interruption.
  • Adjacent to the newly renovated kitchen is the open concept family room. This is a favourite spot for the family to linger after a busy day.
  • The handsome vignette with the stepped mirror and a custom wood chest is a nod to the drama and beauty of art deco styling.
  • A bright and sunny breakfast area with 15’ cathedral ceiling and banquette seating completes the kitchen area. The team selected a banquette to allow for wider pathways and a stunning sight line from the kitchen. Kitchen cabinetry lines the walkway and provides extra storage and the visual flow the family required.
  • Practical finishes were mandatory in the all-white kitchen, which features satin sheen lacquered cabinetry, stone countertops and stained walnut for the island.

A large family demands a big makeover. Fortunately, Tomas Pearce Interior Design Consulting has the talent and muscle to satisfy such a tall order. When the CEO of one of Toronto’s largest and leading luxury condominium developers approached cofounders Tania Richardson and Melandro Quillatan, he was looking for an update as well as a strategy for developing a home that supports the needs of his wife and three teens.

The first floor of this century-old, 3,500 square foot home in Lawrence Park, Toronto is much improved these days owing to its recent renovation which resulted in an improved aesthetic and functionality. The initial lack of architectural interest and weak flow was transformed, resulting in what is now a more current and transitional design.

“Select a neutral palette to provide longevity. Decorative lighting, art and accessories arethe elegant finishing touches.”

Original floors were replaced with wide hardwood planks throughout the main level. In the 375 square foot living room, Tomas Pearce Interior Design Consulting created several conversation areas, with key furnishings linking them together for larger events.

The living room’s soft colours are reflected in the mirrored coffee table from Cocoon Furnishings in Oakville. The large patterned area carpet from Elte Carpet and Home provides a geometric anchor to the light coloured furnishings. Layers of lighting—potlights, sconces and table lampsare sourced from suppliers Sescolite, Casalife and Royal Lighting.

The addition of the banquette within the bay window amplifies usable space and provides additional seating, which comes in handy when entertaining.

When choosing furniture and accessories, select hues and undertones that pair well, creating cohesive flow throughout the home.

“To ensure consistency from room to room,” says Melandro, “use a single wall colour, place furniture strategically to achieve comfortable flow, keep wall paneling and any trim consistent.”

This century-old home has never looked better thanks to its much-needed update.

Photography by Larry Arnal

Southern Belle

  • Designer, Lucinda Robinson, stands in the doorway of the 50s bungalow she decorated for downtown clients in Charleston. In addition to interior design, Lucinda is an established clothing designer. She models a dress from her popular Lucinda Eden shop, located on King St. in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • Green subway tiles on the double-sided fireplace are original to the home, providing colour inspiration throughout. The wool and sisal carpet from GDC home embraces the living room seating and offers the homeowners the comfort they desired.
  • In the dining room, the upholstered chairs from Vanguard Furniture are covered in white, washable suede. The reliable fabric holds up to heavy use, ideally suiting the homeowners’ lifestyle as they are frequent entertainers. Lucinda’s personal favourite in the room is the custom trestle table made by an artisan in North Car olina. A reproduction chandelier from Currey and Co. complements the dark wood tones in the dining table, sideboard and floor.
  • Though the welcoming foyer is mostly neutral, its colour scheme is brightened with the apple coloured lamp from GDC Home which sits on an antique table—a family heirloom.

It’s a southern revival for this 2,000 square foot, 3 bedroom Arts and Crafts bungalow in downtown Charleston thanks to designer Lucinda Robinson.

Having designed the client’s previous homesa traditional single house and a country estateLucinda easily transitioned Kristy Anderson and family to the smaller bungalow without sacrificing function or style.

Since the south is all about hospitality, the home is family-friendly and ready to receive guests at any time.