Top 5 Malta Musts

1- If you like your seafood fresh (and really, who doesn’t?) a side trip to the southern end of the main island lands you in Marsaxlokk, a sleepy little fishing village. Visitors delight in the bounty of colourful, bobbing fishing boats in the harbour.

Dabble Savvy: The fishing boats, called luzzu, sport a painted eye on the hull, protecting them from watery danger.

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Photography by Simon Burn

2- Valletta, Malta’s capital city has many charms. Spend a few days in the pedestrian town to see the sights and enjoy the beaches.

Dabble Savvy: The Upper Barracca Gardens are a bit of a climb (the elevator no longer works) unless you enter via Victoria Gate, then turn left onto St. Ursula Street, go the end of the street and you’ll see the entrance.

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Photography by Simon Burn

3- No trip to Malta is complete without a trek to the top of Mdina. This is the oldest part of the island and the 360 degree views are worth the climb.

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Photography by Simon Burn

4- When you’re ready for some pampering, set out for St. Julian’s, where the chic go to be seen. Picture St. Tropez without the hourdes. A short ferry ride from Valletta brings you there in style.

5- Sure, it’s a bumpy ride, but a Jeep safari in Gozo is a fiendishly fun way to see the island’s main sights. Bring a camera to capture the Salt Pans, Xewkija Rotunda and the megalithic Ġgantija Temples.

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Gozo Salt Pans – Photography by Simon Burn

 

Modern History

  • Sunlight fills the entry, throwing light onto stone walls likely more than 400 years old.
  • A series of glass paneled doors greets the entry and closes to offer privacy (when combined with blackout shades) in the master bedroom.
  • The building’s shell is composed of a combination of pottery and beach sand. The bisque and terracotta colours create natural warmth in the coved dining room.
  • The architects created distinct viewpoints in each of the rooms, often providing a glimpse into adjacent spaces. The organic shaped coffee tables and rustic woven rug support a mandate to use natural, raw materials.
  • The Mediterranean Sea is reflected in a mirror that brings light into the spare living space. The cable strung staircase rises gracefully to the master bedroom above.
  • The galley kitchen efficiently carves utilitarian space into the home and provides those in residence with an expansive view of the Mediterranean Sea.
  • Sleeping quarters are stacked above the living room, where they enjoy full ocean views.

Set above the harbor, facing the majestic Mediterranean Sea in Old Jaffa, is an ancient structure given new life by the thoughtful architects hired to restore its integrity.

Though it’s difficult to determine the structure’s exact age, it is clear that it is hundreds of years old. Over time, changes and additions had damaged the original integrity of the dwelling. The central ideal, therefore, was to restore the original characteristics—the stone walls, the segmented ceilings and the arches—to peel back and expose the original state.

The language of minimalism embedded in a historic residence in Old Jaffa.

“Surprisingly modern, minimalistic construction styles (especially ancient ones) allow us to create new spaces that blend periods together—even intensify them because of the contrast and tension between the ages.” ~ Pitsou

The historical is expressed by preserving the textures and materials of the building’s outer shell and by respecting the engineering accordingly.

The modern is expressed by opening spaces and altering the internal flow, and by incorporating natural materials such as stainless steel banding, iron and wood.

Pistou’s project succeeds in both honoring and preserving the historical and romantic values of the structure while creating a contemporary project suited to today’s lifestyle.

Designed by Pitsou Kedem, Raz Melamed & Irene Goldberg

Photography by Amit Geron

Charleston: Did you know?

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In Charleston, porches are referred to as “piazzas” and are situated to catch harbour breezes and offer a view of the garden.

Homes in Charleston are generally elevated, have large windows and doors and high ceilings in order to have cross-ventilation of breezes from the water.

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Many homes have a distinctive architectural name, in local vernacular, referred to as the Single House. These homes are typically one-room and a hallway wide with long piazzas that span the length of the house. The entrance door faces the street but typically leads to the porch where the home’s front door is found. The homes are oriented in this fashion because the British taxes were based on streetfront measurements.