Modern History

  • Sunlight fills the entry, throwing light onto stone walls likely more than 400 years old.
  • A series of glass paneled doors greets the entry and closes to offer privacy (when combined with blackout shades) in the master bedroom.
  • The building’s shell is composed of a combination of pottery and beach sand. The bisque and terracotta colours create natural warmth in the coved dining room.
  • The architects created distinct viewpoints in each of the rooms, often providing a glimpse into adjacent spaces. The organic shaped coffee tables and rustic woven rug support a mandate to use natural, raw materials.
  • The Mediterranean Sea is reflected in a mirror that brings light into the spare living space. The cable strung staircase rises gracefully to the master bedroom above.
  • The galley kitchen efficiently carves utilitarian space into the home and provides those in residence with an expansive view of the Mediterranean Sea.
  • Sleeping quarters are stacked above the living room, where they enjoy full ocean views.

Set above the harbor, facing the majestic Mediterranean Sea in Old Jaffa, is an ancient structure given new life by the thoughtful architects hired to restore its integrity.

Though it’s difficult to determine the structure’s exact age, it is clear that it is hundreds of years old. Over time, changes and additions had damaged the original integrity of the dwelling. The central ideal, therefore, was to restore the original characteristics—the stone walls, the segmented ceilings and the arches—to peel back and expose the original state.

The language of minimalism embedded in a historic residence in Old Jaffa.

“Surprisingly modern, minimalistic construction styles (especially ancient ones) allow us to create new spaces that blend periods together—even intensify them because of the contrast and tension between the ages.” ~ Pitsou

The historical is expressed by preserving the textures and materials of the building’s outer shell and by respecting the engineering accordingly.

The modern is expressed by opening spaces and altering the internal flow, and by incorporating natural materials such as stainless steel, iron and wood.

Pistou’s project succeeds in both honoring and preserving the historical and romantic values of the structure while creating a contemporary project suited to today’s lifestyle.

Designed by Pitsou Kedem, Raz Melamed & Irene Goldberg

Photography by Amit Geron

Budapest Food: Buda

Conversation flows as easily as the local Tokaj wines and lusty European beers.

First time visitors are bound to leave with a newfound respect for hearty Hungarian food (chicken paprikás alone is worth the airfare) and the enthusiasm with which locals participate in the enjoyment of a good meal with friends.

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ABOVE: The For Sale Pub Restaurant might not actually be for sale but it does have an interesting décor. There are peanut shells on the floor and business cards, boarding passes and paper on the ceiling and walls.

1. Look past the kitschy “medieval” atmosphere at Alabárdos Étterem and focus instead on the authentic home cooking, served fetchingly on fine Herend and Zsolnay china. The setting, inside a 400 year old Gothic building and opposite Matthias Church makes it an ideal location for an evening stroll before dinner.

2. Fortuna 21 – Magyar Vendeglo (Hungarian kitchen) Stone walls and bleached oak floors provide a contemporary backdrop to this dynamic setting where visitors and locals order up traditional favourites such as the goulash soup served tableside in individual kettles. During the summer, sit on the patio and enjoy a cold glass of tokaji. Goulash, bread and wine come in under US$20, making this an affordable sit down experience.

Dabble Savvy: Gratuity may be included on your bill. If not, allow 10%-15% extra and give the waiter the money, do not leave it on the table.

3. The closest thing to a Dean & Deluca in Budapest is Baldaszti’s. The Buda location is tucked into the hillside, near the Funicular. If it’s lunchtime, sample the Hungarian platter with local meats and cheeses.

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ABOVE: Pancakes served with a trio of jams are a perfect breakfast treat. Shop for gourmet groceries in the basement.

4. Gundel is likely the city’s best-known restaurant, certainly one of its most expensive. Admired for its fine cuisine, impeccable service and the early 20th century setting. Elegant dress is recommended.

Dabble Savvy: Take time to admire the Hungarian masterpieces displayed on the walls while waiting for your meal.